Previously asked about weight gain for brazilian lift fat transfer.. (photo)

I had previously asked about brazilian butt lift fat transfer to gain weight to do the procedure. Doctors advised gaining weight was not a good idea, fat can be harvested from other areas. However I've been in consultations and all have rejected doing the procedure on me...(I weigh 122 at 5.5) all muscle I work out everyday so what's the next step? I do not want implants. Am I inoperable because I don't have fat to harvest for the brazi surgery? I'm very healthy and a great candidate to perform on.

Doctor Answers (5)

Don't gain weight.

+1
A lot of women ask me this question because another surgeon recommended gaining weight prior to surgery. I NEVER recommend gaining weight to prepare for this surgery. It is not healthy, you will not have a better outcome, and you will not see long term results.

You would need a live consultation to evaluate areas of liposuction/fat harvest for the procedure.  I have been successful at harvesting enough fat , even in the most athletic women.


Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 57 reviews

BBL

+1
Thank you for the question and picture.


Although I believe you don't require any plastic surgery, if you want to consider having a BBL then I do suggest for you to gain weight. Fat needs to be harvested and transferred and you don't have enough weight to harvest from.

Jaime Campos Leon, MD
Mexico Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 184 reviews

BBL in fairly thin patients

+1
Fat transfer can be done when there are donor sites. It is difficult to tell from the photos whether that is the case or not for you. Best to be seen in person.  Good luck.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

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Previously asked about weight gain for brazilian lift fat transfer.. Definitely not.

+1
Gaining weight before a fat transfer is actually a bad idea, in my opinion.  I have my patients stay at the weight that they at pre-operatively.  Usually this is where the lipodystrophy fat or the fat that "doesn't follow the rules" is more than the patients would like to end up, but we are going to lipo those areas anyway.  
If you transfer fat that is artificially enlarged, there is a much greater chance that these enlarged cell may die, and more fat in cc's has to be transferred to get the result you would like when you are at your final lower body weight, after loosing the fat that you gained for the fat transfer.  We pinch the inner arm and forearm to see as an indicator the general body fat, or the fat that does follow the rules.  It should be about 1/2".  If it is greater than 11/2" the person is fat from their general body fat, and I usually recommend that they loose some weight before doing the lipo.
I can usually get about 600 800cc of fat from love handles and middle and lower back, when I take the time and remove up to 90% of the fat in these areas, even in people like you who are close to their ideal body fat.
Find a surgeon who is aggressive about fat removal for the lipo part of the procedure, leaving only about 1'2" to give a smooth contour.  Removing this fat from the lower back and sides will also enhance the buttocks augmentation.

William J. Seare, MD
Carlsbad Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Previously asked about weight gain for brazilian lift fat transfer

+1
Even in thinner patients, there is usually enough fat to get at least 600 to 700 cc per buttock. An exam would be necessary to confirm.

Find a board certified plastic surgeon who performs hundreds of Brazilian buttlifts each year. Then look at the plastic surgeon's website before and after photo galleries to get a sense of who can deliver the results.

Kenneth Hughes, MD
Los Angeles, CA

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 237 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.