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Post Breast Augmentation Incision Healing?

16 days ago I had a BA with correction of tuberous breasts. I had the incisions around my entire nipple and just removed the surgi-strips on day 14. There is no discharge, or tenderness. There is an occasional shooting pain around the incisions, but it isn't terribly painful by any means. However, my right nipple incision has more scabbing and is darker in the incision line. Is this normal? When in the highest risk for incision infection over? Thank you!

Doctor Answers (7)

Breast Augmentation Healing Timeline

+1
It sounds like your incision healing is progressing normally for 16 days after surgery.  It is very normal to have more "scabbing" and darker incision on one side versus the other once the steri strips are removed.  Shooting pains around the nipple is also normal symptoms of nerve recovery following surgery.  Signs of infection would be increased pain, redness, drainage and/or swelling.  At 16 days out, in the absence of these signs, you are unlikely to experience infection.  Return to your surgeon immediately, should you experience any of these signs or symptoms.

Thank you for your question.

Montgomery Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Incision Issues

+1

Augmentation in the tuberous breast is more likely to feel tight for a while as the skin gradually stretches out.

The incisions are at their greatest risk for infection within the first 48 hours of surgery.

After that time period, the risk is much lower but not zero. The lowest risk is after the skin is completely healed closed. This can happen in as little as 48 hours or take a week or more depending on other factors such as patient health, smoking, diabetes, tension across the line of closure, etc. Sorry, there is no one easy answer.

Always communicate with your surgeon if any changes occur with your incision that cause it to look different in any way.

Web reference: http://www.npshouston.com

Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Incision Recovery After Breast Surgery

+1

Dear Suzie,

At 2 weeks post surgery, it is too early to assess your scars. You have to be a little more patient as scars tend to become red and puffy (peaks at about 2-3 months) and then this change will subside with time; every scar heals at a different pace.

Currently, you should be clear and out of the time zone of an infection. However, I do not mean that it is impossible that you develop an infection so I recommend that you keep on the same care you provide yourself with.

 

Thank you for your inquiry and the best of luck to you.

Dr. Sajjadian

Web reference: http://www.DrSajjadian.com

Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 90 reviews

Incisions Post Op Breast Surgery

+1

Thank you for your question.

It is difficult to give you good advice without examining the area.  You are very early in the recovery process and I would suggest keeping regular follow up appointments with your surgeon so that he/she can make sure that everything is healing nicely.

Best wishes.

Web reference: http://www.poustiplasticsurgery.com/Procedures/Procedure_tubularbreasts.htm

San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 626 reviews

Appearance post-op

+1

From your description, it sounds to me like normal healing but you should check with your surgeon to make sure.

Sacramento Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Incision after breast surgery

+1

Discuss this with your surgeon.  They may recommend taping the breast incisions.  Donald R. Nunn MD  Atlanta Plastic Surgeon.

Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Very early!

+1

This is very early to evaluate scars and differences etc.  have to give it some more time and scar massage creams etc... In terms if infection. You are getting past the most "dangerous"time. You should be fine

West Orange Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 22 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.

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