Is a Post and Build Up Required for Dental Crowns on Front Teeth?

Is a Post and Build Up Required for Dental Crowns on Front Teeth?

Doctor Answers (8)

Is post and build up necessary for anteriors?

+2

every case is different. Just depends on the amount of supporting tooth structure. There is no rule of thumb.


Sugar Land Cosmetic Dentist
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Post and Buildup for Front Teeth

+1

A post and buildup should only be necessary if there is not enough sound tooth structure for a crown to br placed on.  If they are necessary in your case, make sure that tooth colored posts and buildup material is used to prevent any dark areas showing through the crown.  This is only true if an all porcelain crown is used (which should be the case for front teeth) if a porcelain fused to metal crown is used then this does not matter

Brian Dorfman, MD, DMD
Phoenix Oral & Maxillofacial Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Post and core for crowns

+1

First you need to have a RCT in the tooth to have a post placed and a core build up. If your tooth is not Root Canal, then you may just need a core build up. Not all the time you need one or the other, if is not necessary. When a front tooth is Root Canal, depending of what the doctor has to work with and the condition of the tooth, a post and core build up will be needed for more support.

Pamela Marzban, DDS
Fairfax Cosmetic Dentist

Is A Post and Buildup Needed Prior To Placing A Crown?

+1

A post and buildup are not always necessary  when placing crowns on front teeth.  A post is utilized when a tooth has been badly decayed or broken due to trauma.  When utilized, a post is inserted about 3/4 of the way down the root of the tooth and cemented in place.  A buildup is then placed around the post  and the crown is seated on the buildup.  Many posts have been found to cause fractures in roots after they have been in place for many years.  For this reason, I opt for extracting the tooth and placing a dental implant when the tooth is in need of a post.  I have found that I get more longevity out of an implant with less problems in the future.  Good luck.  

Scott Young, DDS
Houston Cosmetic Dentist
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Post and core built-up for anterior crown

+1

The post and core built-up is usually used in anterior teeth to create more support for the crown when the coronal structure is not sufficient and the tooth previously was endodontically treated. This decision is made by the dentist at the time of crown preparation for the crown and is very individual in each situation.

Olga Kharevich, DMD, PhD (in memoriam)
Miami Cosmetic Dentist
5.0 out of 5 stars 30 reviews

Is Post and Build Up Necessary for Anterior Crowns

+1

Only if there is inadequate tooth structure remaining.  Avoid metal posts if at all possible as they can discolor the underlying tooth and cause a gray line to appear or show through crown if an all porcelain restoration is used.  Bonded tooth colored posts are much better cosmetically is a post is required.

Donald L. Wilcox, DDS
Phoenix Cosmetic Dentist
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Posts and Cores on Anterior Teeth are Case by Case Decision.

+1

Every situation is unique. There is no hard and fast rule. It all depends on the integrity of the remaining tooth structure.

Jay Neuhaus, DDS
New York Cosmetic Dentist

Post and core build up is necessary when there is a significant amount of tooth loss

+1

Necessity for a post and core build up depends on the remaining available tooth a dentist has to support a crown.  In general, post is placed in a root canalled tooth to support core buildup. If you have lost a significant amount of tooth due to caries or trauma (your dentist can decide and suggest that); then a post and core is necessary to hold a crown even for a front tooth.

Hema Patel, DDS
Fremont Cosmetic Dentist

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.