Will These Popped out Veins on my Wrist Pose a Problem?

I had a surgery and as part of it was an iv insertion. Week 1 i got bruising on my hand where the iv was placed which I know is normal but I started to feel some pain in three of my fingers as well on my wrist further down from where the iv was inserted. About a week after that two veins on my wrist protruded and they hurt as well. By week 3 i went to a walk in clinic and was told they are inflamed veins. I am 6 weeks post op now I have no pain but still have the protruded veins, will they go?

Doctor Answers (3)

Treating Popped Out Veins

+2

Thank you for your question. The veins have a mild phlebitis, and this will go away in time.  Veins heal very slowly, and this is due as much to the trauma of having a needle poke into the vein as the medications given IV.  The medications irritate the inner lining of the vein, and cause some irritation.  Valium, Toradol, and Propofol or Diprivan are very irritating.  Some antibiotics are as well.  In surgery, you usually get medications IV very fast, and the risk of irritation is increased.  This will heal and in 6-9 months should not be an issue. I hope this helps.


Bay Area Dermatologist
4.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Superficial phlebitis

+1

What you are describing is called superficial phlebitis which is an inflammation of a vein.  This results in the vein becoming tender and usually hard due to clotted blood within the vein. The initial treatment consists of applying heat to the area and taking oral anti-inflammatory agents.  The inflammation will resolve before the hardness does. Usually over several months the hardness will also resolve.  If it doesn't and continues to hurt you, the excision could be done under local anesthesia.

John Landi, MD
Naples General Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Post intravenous (IV) line phlebitis wrist

+1

This is phlebitis and really thrombophlebitis and as long as there is no redness or fevers, it can be watched. If after 4 months the vein is still enlarged and tender to the touch, it can be removed quite simply with local anesthesia in a procedure called microphlebectomy.

Hratch Karamanoukian, MD, FACS
Buffalo General Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

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