Pollybeak Correction - Simple Procedure?

I am considering having a revision rhinoplasty cause I've developed a pollybeak deformity. I have an acquaintance who works as an assistant to a plastic surgeon and he told me that the surgery is a much simpler process that can happen with local anesthesia, it takes less time to heal and that the overall cost of the procedure is significantly smaller than a full nosejob. I can't afford a second nosejob but if this is really the case I would like to look into it. Is there any truth into it?

Doctor Answers (11)

Revision for a pollybeak

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This is far from a simple operation under local anesthesia - to get the best result you will likely need cartilage grafting


Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 141 reviews

Correcting polly-beak deformity is not a simple procedure

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Surgery to correct polly-beak deformity is not a simple procedure. It is a revision rhinoplasty that is usually done under general anesthesia. The cartilage of the lower third of the nose has to be sculpted and adjusted. Any further scar tissue is removed and occasionally bridge augmentation at the top of the nasal bridge has to be performed. Close follow-up is also important because of the potential for reoccurrence. Cortisone shots during the first six months after the revision surgery will help prevent it from coming back.

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 58 reviews

Pollybeak Correction

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I'm sorrry, but I don't  think nasal revision for correction of your pollybeak  will  be a "simple" procedure. Your tip lacks projection; the fullness above your tip is thick skin or excess cartilage. However a careful examination will be necessary before making specific recommendations.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

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Have You Tried a Non-Surgical Treatment

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Cannot tell from photos but some polly beaks are such because the skin thickened as the nose swellig dimished. Maybe the problem is the " soft tissue" as we call it; not necessarily cartilage.

The examination will tell the doctor of such is the case and whether or not the injection of a shrinking medication will work.

Regarding surgery, it is not always as simple a situation as one might think. The surgeon has to be prepared to do what has to be done, including the use of grafted tissue or even insertion of plastic parts.

Revision nasal surgery should not be underestimated.

Robert Kotler, MD, FACS

Beverly Hills, CA

Robert Kotler, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 58 reviews

You will likely require revision rhinoplasty to improve the appearance of your nose.

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I read your posting and reviewed your photo. Your upper bridge is a bit low, and your lower bridge near your tip is a bit high. I think the best approach is to decrease the height of your bridge near your tip, and possibly deproject your tip as well.

Get a second opinion from another rhinoplasty specialist to discuss what may be best for you.

All the best from NJ.

Eric M. Joseph, MD
West Orange Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 278 reviews

Polly beak deformity is when the area just above the tip of your nose is too high

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There are a number of causes for a Polly beak deformity following rhinoplasty. Some are simple to fix and some are more complex. The biggest problem I have seen is when you need a complex treatment and opt for the simple fix that might not be enough, then you have worse problems. I suggest you either discuss this with your surgeon or seek out a specialist in revision Rhinoplasty to discuss the best treatment for your Polly beak deformity.

Steven J. Pearlman, MD
New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 40 reviews

Revision rhinoplasty costs and recovery

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The amount of work in a revision rhinoplasty can be either quite simple or very extensive depending upon what was done to your nose previously and what additional alterations you would like achieved. If it is something as simple as just taking down a small pollybeak and not doing anything else to the nose, then this procedure can often be done under local anesthesia with minimal costs and downtime. However, if other changes need to be made like correcting a hanging tip which you might have or narrowing the mid third or correcting irregularities, other efforts and costs might be involved. I hope this information helps.

Scott Trimas, MD
Jacksonville Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Pollybeak deformity correction

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A polly beak deformity occurs in the lower 1/3 -2/3's of the nose. This is often soft tissue and resiudal dorsal septal cartilage that needs to be taken down in most cases.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Polybeak correction is not "simple"

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It is a mistake to apply the word "simple" to any revision rhinoplasty procedure.  This takes experience and any surgeon who says it is "simple" is either deceiving you or deceiving themselves a bit.  

Richard P. Rand, MD, FACS
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 49 reviews

Pollybeak Nose Deformity Correction

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regarding: " Polly beak Correction - Simple Procedure?
I am considering having a revision rhinoplasty cause I've developed a pollybeak deformity. I have an acquaintance who works as an assistant to a plastic surgeon and he told me that the surgery is a much simpler process that can happen with local anesthesia, it takes less time to heal and that the overall cost of the procedure is significantly smaller than a full nosejob. I can't afford a second nosejob but if this is really the case I would like to look into it. Is there any truth into it
?"

The Parrot Beak or Polly Beak Nose deformity is caused by a combination of factors resulting in a residually elevated septum and relatively low tip complex compared to the line of the dorsum of the nose. Although the lowering of the cartilaginous septum is not as involved as a full reduction rhinoplasty, I would not classify it as "simple". IF it was so simple, WHY would we so so many people with failed Polly beak revision procedures? The operation requires precision and accuracy.

If you believe and trust your surgeon, you may want to ask your surgeon if he could reduce his fees, in your case, to correct this complication.

Dr. Aldea

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 62 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.