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Do I Have a Polly Beak and Should I See the Same Surgeon for Any Corrections?

It's now been 2 months since surgery, I still feel my nose is very large and undefined, but now has a curve down look that may be a polly beak. This was not present before but I'm not an expert so don't want to give it the wrong label.I saw this when the cast came off so to help the shape I strapped it for over a month to no avail. From the front my nose looks very bulb like and undefined, is this all part off the same issue? I also now have a gap on the top left hand side since my surgery.

Doctor Answers (7)

Pollybeak

+2

You do have a pollybeak which can be revised after healing is complete in another 9-10 months. As previously discussed, the depression at the left nasal bone can be fixed at the same time. Consult with your surgeon and get  a second opinion from a surgeon who does revsion rhinoplasty.


Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Pollybeak deformity.

+2

Yes, it is a pollybeak deformity, You should seek out an experienced revision rhinoplasty expert to do the surgery. Wait at least 6 months to do the surgery.

Toby Mayer, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Pollybeak Nasal Deformity After Rhinoplasty

+2

Hi Missy,

Yes, you do have a "pollybeak deformity".  Whether to have your original rhinoplasty surgeon correct the problem depends on her/his confidence in being able to perform the revision, and whether you trust her/him.  You do have time over the next few months to get other opinions.  Revision rhinoplasty should not be done until at least 6 months after your original surgery.  Good luck and be well.

Dr. P

Michael A. Persky, MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

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Rhinoplasty Revision

+1

I am sorry, but yes you have a pollybeak deformity and what also appears in the picture as what we call an open roof.  At this point you unfortunately need to wait and see how things shape out, but you will most likely require some sort of revision rhinoplasty at about 12 months out from your surgery.

I would recommend consulting with a few different plastic surgeons to go over your options.  But the most important thing is to wait about 1 year from the time of your surgery.

Farbod Esmailian, MD
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Polly Beak deformity with possible Open Roof

+1

I am sorry for what you are going through. Unfortunately, you appear to have a substandard rhinoplasty result with a Polly Beak deformity and the dent you are referring to may be a malunion of the left nasal bone or an open roof deformity.

You will need to wait close to a year to allow the swelling to resolve completely but would probably require a revision rhinoplasty. I would begin looking for surgeons who specialize in this operation and see a few in consultation.

Good Luck.

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 59 reviews

Pollybeak Deformity

+1

Based on the picture, you have a pollybeak deformity.  I would at least discuss the available options with your Surgeon and assess his/her confidence level with the situation.  You should remember that revision surgery for Rhinoplasty is typically delayed for a year; this is because a result from Rhinoplasty takes at least 12 months to evolve. Therefore, you may want to exhaust other options such as steroid injections and a tincture of time prior to considering revision.

Stephen Prendiville, MD
Fort Myers Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Pollybeak Deformity

+1

Hi,

Yes it appears that you have a polly beak deformity. You may want to find a surgeon that can correct this. Try to see 2  to 3 other surgeons for a second opinion. Also speak to patients of the surgeon you plan to use.

Best,

Dr.S

Oleh Slupchynskyj, MD, FACS
New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 209 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.