What Treatments to Avoid When Breastfeeding?

Could You Pls Advise on All Types of Facial Treatments Which Need to Be Avoided While Breastfeeding? Thanks

Doctor Answers (6)

During breast feeding avoid facial cosmetic injections

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Despite not having any medical evidence that fillers are dangerous to your baby, you should not chance any risk and avoid these treatments during breast feeding, including Botox.  There have been no studies that formally studied this question.  There should be no problem to undergo microdermabarasion, V-beam laser or Fraxel Restore treatments during breast feeding (provided your baby is not with you during the treatments).


Manhattan Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Facial cosmetic procedures during breast feeding

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All unnecessary  cosmetic procedures should be avoided during pregnancy an breast feeding.

No studies have been done to test the safety of these procedures  under the above circumstances. Nor could they ethically be done. Thus, all advice is purely theoretical and empirical.

In particular phenol peels, which can be toxic to the heart and botox  should be avoided.

Eugene Mandrea, MD
Chicago Dermatologist
4.5 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Breastfeeding

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I would avoid all forms of skin treatment while breast feeding. While I doubt any topical treatment would be a problem, no one knows for sure.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

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What cosmetic treatments to avoid when breastfeeding

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Because we don't know the effects of cosmetic procedures on the baby, it is not recommended to have any cosmetic procedures while pregnant or breastfeeding.

Cosmetic procedures are not tested on pregnant or breastfeeding women, so we have no way of telling what the safety profile of these treatments is, including all injectables and laser procedures.

It is known that Botox for example can drift from an injected area to other areas.

So, what does one do? Use an excellent broad-spectrum sunscreen daily to prevent more sun damage and wrinkling, as well as hyperpigmentation and avoid sun exposure. The hormones present during pregnancy and breastfeeding make women more likely to develop melasma. Sunscreens will help prevent this.

Since there is a greater chance of hyperpigmentation under the action of hormones, laser treatments can potentially have more adverse effects. Also, numbing medicine is used before the procedure, small amounts of which could potentially be absorbed into the body.

For many cosmetic procedures, taking a medication to prevent cold sore breakouts is necessary for several days before and after a procedure.

Skin texture is also different under the influence of hormones. Some women have perfect skin, and some break out with acne quite a bit. Rosacea may also be more active at this time.

Wait until you are done breastfeeding to have cosmetic procedures. We just don't have data on their safety during pregnancy or breast feeding.
 

Emily Altman, MD
Short Hills Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Facial Treatments to avoid while Breastfeeding.

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Out of an undue amount of caution, we discourage our patients from getting any cosmetic procedures like laser treatments, Botox, Radiesse or even peel treatments while breast feeding and also while they are pregnant. 

During this time, we encourage optimal skin care regimen and in-office clinical facials with appropriate products.

Anifat Balogun, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon

Facial cosmetic procedures to avoid while pregnant

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Botox is a noteworthy facial cosmetic procedure that should be avoided while pregnant.  Good luck.  Laser treatments may be safe, but there are not large studies demonstrating the safety of cosmetic procedures on pregnant women.  So this is a difficult question for physicians to answer.  Good luck.  The best advice is to wait on anything major until before or after pregnancy.

Jason R. Hess, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.