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Do Any Plastic Surgeons do "Pro Bono" Work, As Some Attorneys Do? Just Wishful Thinking!

I am a 45 yo mother of four (including triplets!). I am definately in need of some tweaking! I could use Botox for the lines on my forehead/between eyes, crowsfeet. But my biggest concern are the wrinkles I have developed under my eyes. Also, smoker lip. I am trying to find the best solutions, that I can afford.

Doctor Answers (3)

Pro Bono Work by Plastic Surgeons - MUCH More than you think

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Regarding: "Do Any Plastic Surgeons do "Pro Bono" Work, As Some Attorneys Do?  Just Wishful Thinking!
I am a 45 yo mother of four (including triplets!). I am definately in need of some tweaking! I could use Botox for the lines on my forehead/between eyes, crowsfeet. But my biggest concern are the wrinkles I have developed under my eyes. Also, smoker lip. I am trying to find the best solutions, that I can afford
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Your questions discloses a woeful misunderstanding of the meaning of "Pro Bono", its relevance in the legal community and its applicability in Plastic surgeon. It was probably unintentional but it deserves a full response.

Pro Bono is a abbreviation of the Latin PRO BONO PUBLICO. It literally means free or discounted work done for the good of the public. With this in mind, I would be curious how would either my colleagues' or my discounting or fees or even giving them away to you for free for your "lines on (your) forehead/between eyes, crowsfeet...(and) wrinkles under (your) eyes" could in ANY way be construed as benefit ting anyone but you? How could smoothing out your wrinkles at our expense improve the public good?

You need to do further due diligence on how widespread,TRUE Pro Bono work is among lawyers. While the American Bar Association recommends an annual contribution of 50 hours of pro bono work A YEAR, that never enforced and rarely met with many State Bars recommending less than half that amount and lower. Most large law firms routinely fall much shorter of these meager recommendations and often assign the work to inexperienced young lawyers instead of it being done by senior attorneys and full equity partners.

On the other hand, every single Plastic surgeon I know operates many times more on poor and or nonpaying patients in cases of injury and various trauma. Every American Plastic surgeon MUST be on a hospital staff and those hospitals make us responsible for covering their Emergency Rooms without compensation where we must care for everyone who could benefit frok our skills regardless of their ability or willingness to pay. I have yet to see a lawyer wake up at 2 AM and go to his office knowing he'll spend the next few hours working hard without compensation and with the threat of a lawsuit hanging over his/her head. I do not know a single Plastic surgeon who has not been put through this scenario many times in their recent past. I would LOVE to be able to wake up some of these ProBono claimants and have them "hang' with me when REAL Pro Bono work is done.

Lastly, many if not all of us contributor our time, money and effort to correct the ravages of birth defects, disease and injury in the US and abroad. We go on mission trips abroad. We operate on deformed and unable to pay here. We volunteer to operate on our soldiers who were wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Personally, I am very proud of my work and that of my brothers and sisters American Plastic surgeons in improving humanity. If ALL lawyers were even a LITTLE bit more like us, our country WOULD be a much nicer place to live in.

Dr. Peter Aldea

As regards comments - "... puisqu'elle est en chemin, je l'attendrai debout, et l'épée à la main !"
 

Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 52 reviews

Plastic Surgeons do a lot of pro bono work

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Plastic surgeons do a lot of  pro bono work and have for years. Most of this is done with patients who have medically necessary conditions and who do not have the means- burns, cleft lips, emergency room injuries, reconstructive war injuries, and many more. In addition, plastic surgeons also volunteer for these same injuries and conditions in Third World countries.  However, elective cosmetic surgery is not usually part of the pro bono work that plastic surgeons do.

Santa Rosa Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Pro bono plastic surgery

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Plastic surgeons do an enormous amount of free care every year but usually this is in the setting of reconstructive surgery where patients are victims of birth defects, burns, trauma, or cancer.  Generally the cosmetic procedures are not offered free because these aren't medically necessary.

Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.