I Am Planning to Do a Rhinoplasty, I Am Asian with Low Bridge, Broad Nose?

I am planning to do a rhinoplasty. I am Asian with low bridge , and broad nose. I sent my photo to a clinic for consultation, the surgeon recommend me to use silicon for bridge enhancement, alarplasty and rhino-tip surgery ( for fat removal, septoplaty, collumela nasi) I am not sure why I need to have rhino-tip , is that the same as bulbuos surgery? what is the risk ?

Doctor Answers (8)

Risks with Asian rhinoplasty

+1

With any rhinoplasty surgery there is a risk of infection, scarring and undesirable cosmetic or functional result.  Using a synthetic implant such as silicone increases the risk of infection, and also carries a risk of migration and extrusion (coming through the skin).  

Often when the bridge is raised, tip refinement will help balance the overall aesthetic of the nose.  


Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

Asian rhinoplasty to address low bridge and broad nose

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The problems you describe and procedures recommended during your consultation sound pretty common in Asian patients like yourself.

rhino-tip surgery refers to addressing tip fullness and bulbosity to make it more refined.

You can read more about having rhinoplasty and the risks of surgery at my web reference link below.

Thomas A. Lamperti, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Asian Rhinoplasty

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It is impossible to make recommendations without seeing your nose; I need pictures to respond. The changes you're talking about are typical for many Asian individuals. I will say that I prefer to use the patient's own cartilage to augment the nose to avoid the problems of infection, movement, and extrusion seen with silicone implants.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

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Asian rhinoplasty

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There are may different things that can be offered base upon your needs. Without an exam or at least picture it is impossible to say.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
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Asian rhinoplasty

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 Asian rhinoplasty usually involves adding a dorsal implant along the bridge which can be composed of either Silastic, or the patient's own natural cartilage harvested from inside the nose. An alar-plasty involves removing small wedges of skin at the floor of the nose, to narrow the nostrils.Tip work  is done only for broad bulbous tips, however some Asian patients have adequate  nasal tips and did not need any tip surgery.  Virtual rhinoplasty software is available  on our website  you to give an idea  what your new nose might look like

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 60 reviews

Asian Augmentation Rhinoplasty

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For most Asian augmentation rhinoplasty to correct a low bridge, a dorsal implant is a good choice with vertically zero risks. If a tiplasty is needed, then your cartilage can be used to enhance this area. This combination is very safe and gives natural aesthetic results for the Asian nose.

C. Carson Huynh, MD, DMD
Atlanta Oral & Maxillofacial Surgeon
3.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Asian rhinoplasty typically requires enhancement of the bridge, tip and nostril narrowing

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Many Asians require enhancement in the areas you listed. For tip definition, cartilage is added to stiffen up the soft areas that look bulbous. Some defatting is usually needed as well. For the bridge, surgeons have their own preferences for using only your tissues or using a synthetic implant.

If you have a bulbous tip, then thino tip surgery is the correct treatment. This is also a difficult part of the operation, especially if you have excess nostril showing (i.e., the nose is short).

Charles S. Lee, MD, FACS
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 52 reviews

Need an in person consultation

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You should never do surgery after any consultation that was not in person. You have legit questions that need to be answered directly by the surgeon who would do the surgery.  Nothing less is acceptable.

Richard P. Rand, MD, FACS
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 51 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.