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Breast Implants Incision Types

I'm scheduled to have both tummy tuck and breasts enhancement (incision under boobs) in 2 weeks. Instead of having the incision on the skin. Can my doctor go under the skin for incision during my TT? knowing, I'll have good visual scaring from the TT I want to eliminate having another if possible.

Doctor Answers (24)

Breast implant incision types

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Hello! Thank you for the question!  The typical incision used for breast augmentation are: inframammary (in the fold beneath your breast), periareolar (at the border of the areola), axillary (within the armpit crease), and TUBA (through the umbilicus). Incision placement will do a lot with your preference, surgeon comfort level with that approach, and the type of implant - silicone implants will be difficult to place within certain access incisions. Breast augmentation scars are well concealed and are very discrete. They should not be visible within clothing, and likely hidden without clothing. If your concern is the visibility without garments, you should consider remote access incisions such as in the armpit. However, these other incisions heal very well on the breast and often times inconspicuous. 

It is common for scars to fully mature for up to a year. In the meantime, there are a few things that may help to ameliorate your incision/scar. The most proven (as well as cheapest) modality is simple scar massage. Applying pressure and massaging the well-healed scar has been shown to improve the appearance as it breaks up the scar tissue, hopefully producing the finest scar as possible. Other things that have been shown to add some benefit, albeit controversial, are silicone sheets, hydration, and topical steroids. In addition, avoidance of direct sunlight to the incision will significantly help the appearance as they tend to discolor with UV light during the healing process. 

If unsightly scars are still present after approximately a year's time, other things that your surgeon may consider are intralesional steroid injections, laser, or just surgical revision of the scar itself.

Consult with a plastic surgeon your goals, concerns, and expectations. Certainly incisions should be considered, but should not limit your overall result by hindering visualization and access to your surgeon, and what produces the best results in his/her hands.

Hope that this helps! Best wishes!


Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Breast implant incision wuestion

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This approach has been used but is not a standard surgical incision for placing breast implants. The three most used incisions are breast fold incision, peri areola and arm pit. While my favorite is the arm pit incision using an endoscope this is an advanced procedure needing specific training and specific equipment. Your doctor will recommend what he or she works best in their hands. Good luck and please see the consultation of a board certified plastic surgeon.

Gregory Lynam, MD
Richmond Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 25 reviews

Breast implant scars

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I agree with your plastic surgeon. Going through your tt incision is technically possible but risks issues with violation of the inframammary fold and the ability to carefully and accurately dissect the implant pocket. The IMF incision is tiny, heals well, and will help your surgeon achieve a good and reliable result. Good luck! Dr Kerr

Mahlon Kerr, MD, FACS
Austin Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 94 reviews

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Breast implant incisions

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There are three commonly used sites for breast implant placement.

  1. Under the breast, inframammary
  2. Partly around the areola, periareolar
  3. Under the arm, transxillary

In my opinion this is almost always a preference issue only.  The most common incision is the inframammary.  I feel this is the most flexible incision to work with the breast, AND I believe it is the least obvious scar.  Rarely is a patient unhappy with the scar.

As far as placing the implant from  a tummy tuck..it can be done, however, I would not recommend this approach. I beleive it does not provide the same exposure to place the implant, which is critical in acheiving a nice result.

Steven S. Carp, MD
Akron Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 19 reviews

Incision choice for breat implants is multi-factorial

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Choosing the best incision for breast augmentation

There are basically four choices of incision for placing breast implants  - Inframammary, per-areaolar,  transaxillary and trans-umbilical.  Choosing the incision for placement of the implants which is best in any given situation can be affected by many factors – these can be broken down into patient specific factors and surgeon specific factors.

Patient specific factors include ethnicity and tendency for poor scarring (some ethnic groups have a propensity for hypertophic or even keloid scarring), pre-existing anatomy (e.g.  Is a given patient’s areolae large enough for placement of a pre-filled silicone implant?)

Surgeon specific factors tend to include the biases and experience of the surgeon, which should not be discounted or taken lightly. 

My personal experience after over 3000 breast augmentation is that inframammary and peri-areolar incision give the most control over the breast implant pocket and that transaxillary and trans-umbilical incision have a higher revision rate.
 

W. Tracy Hankins, MD
Las Vegas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 48 reviews

Implants

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I agree with other opinions and would stick to the plan given by your surgeon. The incisions are small and allow better access to the breast

Michael Hueneke, MD
Nashville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Breast Implants - Inserted During Tummy Tuck via Tummy Tuck Incision

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Hi CallMeSue in washington, dc,

The short answer is - Yes, the implants can be placed in this manner (ie via the TT incision).

The more complete answer is that although they can be placed in this manner, I would not normally advise it.  It's a long way from that incision to the TOP of where the breast implant would go - and you might need access that high in case there were some bleeding or some other issue.  Furthermore, by extending the incision into the breast you're risking opening up the inframammary crease too much.  I'm not normally a fan of this approach.

That being said, some surgeons do like it and if you're convinced that that's what you want, you should go around until you can find one or more surgeons who will do this.

I hope that this helps, and good luck,

Dr. E

Alan M. Engler, MD, FACS
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 155 reviews

Best incision breast implants

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You should stick with your plan of having the tummy tuck with  the breast implants placed through the inframammary approach. This gives your Dr. the most control over the results. The scar should be small and inconspicuous. Also it is probable with  what he/she is most comfortable.

Ernest D. Cronin, MD
Houston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Breast implant incisions

+1

While it is possible to do an augment from a TT approach, I do not think that is the best approach.  If you are concerned about having a scar on your breast from an augment, then you could use a trans-axillary approach for the surgery.  The scar can be placed in the highest axillary wrinkle.  Aesthetically, I believe the axillary scar gives the nicest result when compared to a peri-areolar or infra-mammary.

Stephen J. Ronan, MD, FACS
San Francisco Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Breast incision

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I understand your question and wanting less scar on your body.  However, to violate the integrity of the inframmamary fold can  be froth with problems.  The folds maybe uneven, the implant could migrate down toward the abdomen, and many more.  This has been tried with infrequent success.  Do proceed with caution.  The breast scars heal so favorably do not fear them.  Good luck to you.

Rodger Wade Pielet, MD (in memoriam)
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.