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Is There Any Way to See a Person's Nasal Cartilage Before Surgery, Such As by X-ray or MRI?

Is There Any Way to See a Person's Nasal Cartilage Before Surgery, Such As by X-ray or MRI?

Doctor Answers (4)

Can you see nasal cartilage with XRAY or MRI

+1

Three dimensional CT scan and MRI would show the nasal cartilages but I question the benefit of such an endeavour?  The cost simply can't be justified....an experienced Rhinoplasty surgeon will see the pertinent nasal cartilage and bone in person and should not need to rely on this type of imaging.


Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Rhinoplasty mri

+1

You can definitely see cartilage on MRI. The question is whether that's important. If you or your surgeon feel that it is important then have an MRI. MRI is not normally part of a rhinoplasty workup. Good luck.

Howard Webster, MBBS, FRACS
Melbourne Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 53 reviews

See cartilage on xray

+1

Yes you can but, ther is no reason to spend your money on it. Deviated septum is primatily a clinical diagnosis for the purposes of pre-op evaluation.

David A. Bray, Sr., MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

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Cartilage, x ray

+1

Although a good idea it's not practical to attempt this kind of imaging at this time. Cartlage will not show on x ray and the cost of MRI would not be justified. There are three dimensional modeling programs for CT scan and photos but again translating them into practical benefit vs cost is not there yet. There likely will come a time when computer modeling programs will analyze structure and help to determine an operative plan but we are still very early in that. 

Michael L. Schwartz, MD
West Palm Beach Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

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