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Permanent Makeup While on Latisse?

Can you get permanent makeup (eyeliner) done while using Latisse?

Doctor Answers (17)

Stop using Latisse on the day of permanent makeup treatment

+1

I would recommend stopping the Latisse on the day of treatment and during the early recovery period, until any crusting or eyelid irritation from the permanent makeup procedure resolves. You can certainly start using the Latisse again once things have settled down and your eyes are fully healed from the permanent makeup procedure.


Bay Area Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Latisse and 'permanent' eyeliner

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There should be no interaction with Latisse which will enhance eyelash growth and 'permanent' eyeliner or other makeup. I would try Latisse first, since it is not permanent. You might be surprised at the result in enhancing your eyes appearance.

As for permanent makeup, you should understand that it is not really permanent. As a tatoo, it will fade in intensity, depigment from black to blue, and often becomes less crisp  with time. To maintain the darkness and crispness of the tatoo. mutliple treatments over your lifetime will be the norm. So do consider this carefully, since reversal is difficult particularly on the eyelid margin.

Carlo Rob Bernardino, MD
Monterey Oculoplastic Surgeon
3.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Permanent makeup or Latisse for eyelashes

+1

Absolutely.  Permanent makeup will fill the void of time before the Latisse begins to make a noticeable difference. 

Raffy Karamanoukian, MD, FACS
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 47 reviews

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Permanent Eyeliner and Latisse

+1

You can use Latisse 3 weeks after permanent eyeliner has been applied to allow for proper healing.

Amir Moradi, MD
San Diego Facial Plastic Surgeon
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Permanent makeup while on Latisse

+1

Yes, you can go ahead and have the permanent makeup while on Latisse.  There should be no problems.  Good luck with your procedure.

David Shafer, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 56 reviews

Permanent eyeliner application is okay when on Latisse

+1

No problem.  Go ahead and have the permanent eyeliner applied if you wish.  The Latisse will have no effect.

Vincent N. Zubowicz, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Using Latisse and getting permanent eyeliner.

+1

It is ok to use Latisse if you are planning to get permanent eyeline howeverr you should wait until all the healing is complete from the permament eyeliner treatment.  Because Latisse will grow you lashes you may want to try that first to see if you are happy with that look before going permanent. 

David A. F. Ellis, MD
Toronto Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Latisse may be better than permanent makeup

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You can get permanent makeup while using Latisse.  However, Latisse may be better than permanent makeup.  I suggest using Latisse until you see its full effects, 3 to 4 months, and then decide whether you still desire permanent make up.

Daryl K. Hoffman, MD
Los Gatos Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Permanent make up and Latisse

+1

I would recommend that if you undergo permanent make up that you hold on the latisse before and after until you have completely healed from the permanent make up procedure. You should have no open sores or complications. Once you are back to normal , then you may safely resume Latisse.

Steven Hacker, MD
West Palm Beach Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Latisse and permanent makeup eyeliner application

+1

There is no reason why permanent  makeup eyeliner cannot be used in conjunction with Latisse. Keep in my that regular use of Latisse alone should get you some pigmentation along upper eyelids.

William Ting, MD
Bay Area Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.