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what percentage of Retin-A is useful for sagging facial skin?

Doctor Answers (3)

Retin- A for Sagging Skin

+1
Thank you for your question. Retin A is great for fine lines, pigmentation and texture correction. This product will not help sagging skin. I would recommend consulting with a Board Certified plastic surgeon for different surgery options to correct these concerns.

Best Wishes,

Pablo Prichard


Phoenix Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Retin A for saggy skin

+1
Retin A is the trademarked name for retinoic acid or tretinoin.  This derivative of Vitamin A was first approved as an acne drug and later marketed for aging skin, including pigmentation disorders, fine lines, etc.  Retinyl palmitate is the Vitamin A derivative we all have in our skin as children but which is lost as a result of aging. Retinol is an alcohol derivative of Vitamin A which is much weaker that the tretinoin or acid form.  None of these work for sagging skin which usually requires surgery.  Tretinoin and other forms are very helpful for the aging skin in that they increase cell turnover, increase circulation and increase collagen content of the skin (all of which decrease as we age).  Side effects including dry skin, flakiness, redness and irritation are really evidence that the treatment is working and can be mitigated by proper usage.  Therefore education is very important for receiving the benefits and avoiding the disadvantages of using tretinoin.

Richard O. Gregory, MD
Orlando Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Retin-A for sagging facial skin

+1
Retin-A helps with fine lines and texture. It will not help with sagging, AT ALL.


"This answer has been solicited without seeing this patient and cannot be held as true medical advice, but only opinion. Seek in-person treatment with a trained medical professional for appropriate care."

F. Victor Rueckl, MD
Las Vegas Dermatologist
4.5 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

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