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Can people with one kidney safely have the Vanquish fat removal procedure?

My right kidney was surgically removed in 2009. Today I am in excellent health except for a stubborn belly bulge I can't get rid of through diet and exercise. Is the Vanquish fat removal procedure considered safe for someone with one healthy kidney? If the dead fat cells are passed through the kidney, might this put a strain on the remaining organ? Also, I believe my surgeon used tiny metal clamps to tie tubes and vessels when he removed my kidney. Could these cause a problem for Vanquish?

Doctor Answers (3)

Vanquish with one kidney.

+1
Hi,
Since you do have metal clamps near your kidney, it would be safest to contact the manufacturer, BTL, and ask them if Vanquish would be safe for your special medical condition.

Warmly,
Dr. Liu


Newport Beach Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 34 reviews

Vanquish Safe with only one kidney

+1
Vanquish can safely be performed on patients with only one kidney.  The primary contraindication for treatment with Vanquish is the presence of metal implant or metal device, including a pacemaker or defibrillator.  While Vanquish does rely on the excretory system, the procedure should not put undue stress on your remaining kidney.  Of course, it is vital to make your provider aware of your condition and surgical history.  Best of luck with your treatments!

Kent V. Hasen, MD
Naples Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 30 reviews

Vanquish contraindications

+1
Unless you have a permamently inserted metallic object close to the areas to be treated, there would not be a problem using Vanquish. you can go ahead and have the treatment safely if you only have one functioning kidney.

Ahmet R. Karaca, MD
Detroit Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

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