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Pectus Excavatum and Pec Implants

I am 37 year old male with pectus excavatum. It was described by a pedatric surgeon that I have a 'grand canyon' appearance with slightly flared ribs. I can provide digital pictures. I was told I am not a candidate of nuss procedure and I think it wold be too painful over implants. I am trying to go for a symmetrical appearance. Its noticeable with shirt on or off. Can I expect a good outcome? Also, how will implants affect my running (I do 5k, half and full marathons)?

Doctor Answers (3)

Pectus Excavatum and Pec Implants

+1

Implants over the sternum may be a viable option for a larger defect. Fat grafting can be helpful in smaller defects or in camouflaging the implant.

Kenneth Hughes, MD

Los Angeles, CA

Web reference: http://www.hughesplasticsurgery.com/Pectoral-Implants.php

Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 149 reviews

Pectus excavatum

+1
It sounds like you might need a custom implant to help camouflage the depression around the midsection of your chest wall. I have done this procedure for many patients with similar situations and they are happy. Every surgery has potential risks and complications (this one does as well) so find a surgeon who has performed this surgery and who can give you honest advice.

Web reference: http://www.poustiplasticsurgery.com/Procedures/procedure_pecimplant.htm

San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 628 reviews

Pectoral Implants not ideal for pectus excavatum

+1

Pectus excavatum is a central sternal deformity, at its deepest, and it tapers out to the sides of the rib cage. Pectoral implants enhance the pectoralis muscle which is not located over the sternum. Building up the outline of the pectoral muscles is likely to make the pectus excavatum deformity look worse as it does not improve the sternal area. You should consider other implant options that can be used directly over the depressed sternum.

Indianapolis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.