Can a PDS Plate, in Revision Septoplasty, Be Done Through the Closed Approach?

Very interested in this option as it has been used in Europe with extremely high success rates. I can't find any information on if it needs to be done through the open approach only. Also, if any surgeons are currently using this method, I would appreciate their response in sharing their results. Thank you.

Doctor Answers (3)

Closed Approach to Place PDS Plate in Revision Septoplasty

+1

To answer your question a PDS plate can be placed with a closed approach. I appreciate your intellectual curiosity, but select an experienced surgeon rather than a device and the technique used to place it.


Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Using PDS plate with open or closed approach

+1

Either an open or closed approach can be used. A big issue is to make sure that adequate tissue coverage of the plate is maintained after surgery.

In complex revision rhinoplasty and septal surgery I have found the plate to be useful. It isn't needed routinely in these situations (even with revision septoplasties), but can prove useful to stabilize very distorted septal cartilage.

You should consult with someone experience with revision procedures like yours to see what options you have.

Thomas A. Lamperti, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

PDS plate in rhinoplasty

+1

PDS plate can be used in both closed and open cases. It is most often cited in open cases as these are usually descriptions of repair of the worst twisted and deviated septums. When needed it can certainly be used in closed cases. It's main value is to provide additional support during the healing process to cartilage that might on it's own be to weak for certain applications. The PDS disappears after 6-9 months and by that time there is enough healing to be stable.

Michael L. Schwartz, MD
West Palm Beach Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

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