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I Have a Paralized Vocal Cord - Can I Still Have a Botox Treatment?

I was diagnosed with a right paralized vocal cord from the swine flu vaccine. I went through speech therapy and my voice is fine but the paralysis is permanent. I have received botox a few years before the paralysis and would like to continue treatments. Am I still a candidate for Botox? I am interested in removing frown lines and forehead lines. Do you recommend another treatment if I'm not a candidate?

Doctor Answers (20)

Will Botox affect the vocal cord?

+2

According to everything I've read and seen there should be no affect if small amounts of botox or dysport were utilized in the forehead or glabella areas .Nonetheless , I would discuss the case with your ENT doctor to get clearance and in addition perform a test site with smaller dosages and never inject more than a very limited number of units- all as a precaution . There have been reported deaths using Botox- in very high repeated dosages. There have never - to my knowledge- been a fatality from any cosmetic procedure with Botox .

Web reference: http://www.advanceddermatologypc.com/cosmetic/cos_botox.html

Long Island Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Botox contraindications

+1

There is no contraindication to treat someone with a paralyzed vocal cord. I would not recommend treatment in the neck as this can result in temporary vocal paralysis.  Myasthenia gravis is a contraindication.

Miami Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Botox with Paralyzed Vocal Cord?

+1

Florida,

There should be absolutely no reason why you cannot receive Botox injections for cosmetic purposes placed into the forehead musculature.  With the history you have related from your vocal cord paralysis related to the swine flu vaccine I would not recommend treatment of the platysmal bands in the neck with Botox to avoid the possibility of paralysis of your functioning vocal cord.

Pensacola Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Paralyzed Vocal Chord. Can I Still Get Botox?

+1

Hi Florida.  You should be fine.  Although Botox has been known to affect other areas of the body than it was injected, this is only the case with VERY high doses for non-cosmetic indications.  Botox for cosmetic purposes has not been shown to have the kind of effect you are worried about.

If you are still concerned, you should check with your ENT, but we would not have a problem with providing your treatment.  Hope this helps and good luck.

Web reference: http://www.celibre.com/what-is-botox.aspx

Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Botox and Side Effects

+1

Botox and Dysport in the there package insert warn about systemic effects and distant spread.  However, to date there have been no reports of this happening with the cosmetic usage of these products.  The treatment of the frown lines or forehead lines should be safe.  If you have any concerns check with your ENT first and of course, inform you injecting pysician of your medical problem.

Annapolis Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Botox or Dysport can be used on the forehead if you have one paralyzed vocal cord

+1

There shouldn't be an issue with having Botox injections on the forehead, or Dysport injections, as this should not affect the vocal cords.  It is interesting to know that Botox has been a treatment of vocal cord disorders.  You should have an ENT doctor OK your Botox treatment of the forehead just to be cautious.  Don't have Botox suggested for platysma neck muscle band tightening or horizontal neck creases as there have been cases of high doses of Botox injected into theskin of the neck with weakening of swallowing. This indicates that for you, the neck should be avoided as it is too close to the vocal cords.

Web reference: http://www.thenyac.com/botox/index.html

Manhattan Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Botox and vocal cord paralysis

+1
Botox used to treat the glabella and forehead lines should be safe to do and should not affect your paralyzed vocal cord. The Botox affects the muscles locally in the areas treated if used appropriately for cosmetic results.
Austin Dermatologist

Botox Frown Lines and Forehead Wrinkle Treatments in patient with Paralyzed Vocal Cord.

+1

There should be no issues with Botox Cosmetic treatments to your forehead wrinkles and frown lines since the paralysis of your right vocal cord was not the result of a systemic neurological or musculoskeletal disorder.

Given your right paralyzed vocal cord, I would not however receive any Botox Cosmetic injections to your voice box or laryngeal area.

Seattle General Surgeon

Botox And Paralized Vocal Cord

+1

You can have Botox injected in your forehead without any problems, despite your paralized vocal cord. I would not recommend Botox injections in the neck muscles because of the proximity of the vocal cords - any compromise of the good cord could obstruct yourairway.

Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Botox injections for frown lines and forehead lines will not affect your vocal cord.

+1

I read your concern. Facial Botox treatments will not affect your voice or vocal cord function.

It's relatively uncommon, but possible, for idiopathic vocal cord paralysis to lead to permanent paralysis. Make sure you've consulted a certified, reputable ENT about your vocal cord. If testing hasn't been performed, you should request a CT scan of your neck and chest to follow the course of the recurrent laryngeal nerve. You need to make sure your vocal paralysis isn't from a thyroid tumor, larynx tumor, or chest tumor / lymph node. I have seen left vocal paralysis on 2 occasions from an enlarged left atrium of the heart. I haven't seen vocal paralysis related to an immunization.

I hope this is helpful for you.

Web reference: http://ericmjoseph.com/index.cfm/PageID/4044

West Orange Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 256 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.

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