Pain After TT Once Numbness Started to Subside?

Hello, and thank you in advance for your help. I started to regain sensation after an uneventful TT about nine weeks post op. at the same time, I feel a pain under the skin on my right side. What could this be? Will that pain be permanent?

Doctor Answers (4)

Pain post tummy tuck.

+1

Pain a few months following a tummy tuck is common. However, most of these pains should calm down and go away over time. Antiinflammatories are very beneficial. If the pain is worsening, a clinical examination to localize the pain is called for.


Boca Raton Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Pain post tummy

+1

This is probably due to soem sensory nerves in the skin on the right side.I would put ice and an antiinflammatory like motrin.that should handle it.I assume you are not having fever and chills.

Robert Brueck, MD
Fort Myers Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Pain after tummy tuck...

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 Busy45Mom:

 

It's probably just post-surgical swelling related and normal. Occasionally a dissolving stitch can cause some pain. More rarely a "neuroma" can form on the end of nerve and give some pain after surgery. For now, I wouldn't worry. Let your surgeon know about it and take some Motrin on days or times of day that it tends to act up.

 

Hope this helps,

 

Dr. Michael in Miami 

Michael Salzhauer, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 259 reviews

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Hello

+1

 

 

9 weeks post-surgery it’s normal to start getting sensation back, it usually takes months for the nerves to regenerate. You should follow up with your PS; we cannot diagnose or treat you without an exam or a picture to have some kind of idea to go off. Good luck

 

Stuart B. Kincaid, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

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