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Overprojected Nose and Wide Nostrils when Smiling. Would I Need a Full Rhinoplasty or a Tip-plasty? (Photos)

Hi, I have been considering Rhinoplasty for a while now and would like a professional opinion on what type of procedure I would need. I feel it is overprojected and slightly bulbous at the tip, and when I smile the tip droops and my nostrils go very wide and flare out above the tip. I always avoid front on photos because of this. I am happy with the profile (I have no dorsal hump) and would only want the tip refined and the nostrils made smaller. Would tip refinement be sufficient? Thanks

Doctor Answers (7)

Over Projected Nose with Wide Nostrils

+1

On the basis of the pictures submitted I don't think you need a full rhinoplasty to decrease tip projection. It is unlikely that it will be necessary to fracture the nasal bones or do any work in the bridge of your nose. That can be answered with better pictures described on my website or certainly after a physical examination before surgery.  


Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Nasal tip refinement

+1

I believe that tip refinement would be an improvement for you since your nasal tip is over projected. You may need a slight lowering of the nasal dorsum at that time as well.  

Jeffrey Zwiren, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Overprojected Nose and Wide Nostrils when Smiling. Would I Need a Full Rhinoplasty or a Tip-plasty?

+1

 Not sure that the nasal tip is over projected from the photos provided.  The chin is weak and the nasal tip and nostrils are crooked.  Tip-plasty, instead of a full Rhinoplasty would be able to address these issues however, the bridge does appear to be a bit scooped giving the illusion of an over-projected tip.  Only a Rhinoplasty would be able to address this issue which would not be improved with atop-plasty alone.

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

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Rhinoplasty for over-projected nose and wide nostrils

+1

  A full rhinoplasty would be required to de-project  be overly-projecting nose. An alar -plasty would be required to narrow the nostrils. Releasing of the depressor septi ligament would be required to prevent the tip from drooping upon smiling. The bulbous tip can be addressed through a combination of tip suturing techniques or cartilage removal, it just depends on how wide the pre-existing tip cartilages are. A full closed rhinoplasty will be required to perform these maneuvers.

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
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Rhinoplasty for the overprojected nose.

+1

Rhinoplasty for the overprojected nose, etc requires more than just the tip. Select a very experienced rhinoplasty surgeon who does natural noses. You can send better photos as described on my website for a better answer. 

Toby Mayer, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Overprojected Nose and Wide Nostrils when Smiling. Would I Need a Full Rhinoplasty or a Tip-plasty?

+1

You need in my opinion a 3/4 rhinoplasty. Most likely no fractures but only in person examination allows that exact operation to be determined.  

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 61 reviews

Overprojected Nose and Wide Nostrils when Smiling. Would I Need a Full Rhinoplasty or a Tip-plasty?

+1

           The nasal tip can be refined, and the nostrils can be made smaller.  The tip can be deprojected as well.  This series of maneuvers would constitute a rhinoplasty, but the names matter little here.  All of these things can be accomplished through a closed rhinoplasty.  Find a plastic surgeon with ELITE credentials who performs hundreds of rhinoplasties and rhinoplasty revisions each year.  Then look at the plastic surgeon's website before and after photo galleries to get a sense of who can deliver the results.

Kenneth Hughes, MD Los Angeles, CA

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 180 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.