Ask a doctor

Hard Lumpy Tip 3 Months Post Op. Swelling or Scar Tissue? (photo)

I had rhinoplasty on October 3. It is now January 16 and I feel like my nose is even bigger than before in terms of the front and the profile. The surgery was supposed to be a minor closed procedure to reduce a dorsal hump. However, it does not appear to be healing as desired. I know I still have to wait to consider revision. Is there any hope of it correcting itself?

Doctor Answers (8)

Hard lumpy tip

+3

Part of the reason the tip looks bigger is that if it was untouched and only the dorsum was worked on then it is now out of proportion and more noticeable making it look bigger. However your photo suggests that you still may have a fair amount of cartilage hump that needs to be lowered unless this is the look you and your surgeon agreed on before surgery. Being patient can only help and staying in contact with your doctor about your concerns and options is very important at this time.

Fort Lauderdale Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Rhinoplasty surgery

+3

Dear tucansam,

  • If it is truly scar tissue underneath the bump, steroids can be injected to bring it down
  • Did the nose ever look good right after surgery and then the hump started?
  • Start with your original surgeon first to see what he says

Best regards,

Nima Shemirani

Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Rhinoplasty???

+3

 I am so sorry to see such an outcome fallowing a rhinoplasty. No, things are unlikely to improve. Please consider requesting your operative report from your surgeon and seek evaluation by a qualified Rhinoplasty surgeon in your area. Members of the Rhinoplasty  Society or the ASAPS are going to be your best bet for future corrective surgery.  Best,

 

Gary R Culbertson, MD, FACS

Columbia Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Hard Lumpy Tip 3 Months Post Op.

+2

Of course examination would be required for a final opinion. However from your pictures it appears that you have a polly-beak deformity, causing the fullness on the profile photo. I believe this is from the septum/upper lateral cartilages being too high. The hardness of the tip is part of the normal recovery process at 3 months.

I would wait until the tip has softened, and discuss options with an experienced rhinoplasty surgeon.

Houston Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 52 reviews

Wait for a year before making a final judgement

+2

After a rhinoplasty procedure the nose will taken some time to achieve the final shape.  There is also a 5-10% chance in experienced hands that you may need a revision procedure.  Many patients are unaware of this fact.  But at this point you should be patient.

Toronto Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Residual Dorsal Hump after Rhinoplasty

+1

   Even rhinoplasty surgeons who do hundreds of rhinoplasties each year have to revise a few.  I would wait for at least 6 months if not a year and take it from there.  You will likely need additional correction.  Kenneth Hughes, MD Los Angeles, CA

Web reference: http://www.hughesplasticsurgery.com/Rhinoplasty.php

Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 147 reviews

Hard Lumpy Tip 3 Months Post Op. Swelling or Scar Tissue?

+1

 From the photos provided, the Rhinoplasty did reduce the dorsal hump however some cartilage hump seems to remain.  It's still early in the recovery phase and this could still decrease somewhat but IMO, it won't disappear completely.

Web reference: http://www.drfpalmer.com/Rhinoplasty.html

Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Issues with nose

+1

It looks like form you new profile that you still have a dorsal hump.  The tip will stay firm for quite some time. If you are unhappy, then I would wait about a year before having a revision.

Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.

You might also like...