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Can an Otc Chemical Peel Lighten Dark Sun Spots and Rough Keratosis on Legs and Arms?

Doctor Answers (2)

Buyer beware

+2

Chemical peels work buy resurfacing the skin, and involve application of chemical substance, typically an acidic or basic compounds which are used to produce a controlled skin injury.  In general, skin resurfacing procedures can be classified as superficial, medium-depth or deep, according to their level of injury. When a dermatologist/physician considers a chemical peel for your skin, we evaluate your skin type, skin sensitivity, history of viral infections (which can be reactivated by chemical peels),and  depth of the pigment in the skin if being used for brown spots or melasma.  Sometimes at home peels, particularly random treatments ordered off the internet, can be harmful if done incorrectly, and depending on potential strength, can even cause scarring. Alternately, if peels are performed for problems that won't respond to a mild superficial peel, you may waste a lot of money on a treatment that won't deliver the results you are seeking. Given the amount of these factors involved I would recommend having a physician evaluate your skin before doing a home treatment. Rough lesions on your legs could be any range of growths, from seborrheic keratoses to precancerous lesions, which is why it is always a good idea to have them evaluated first before ever self treating.


Stuart Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

See A Specialist for Severe Sun Damage Skin Treatment

+1

Dark sunspots and rough keratosis indicates that most likely you have severe sun damage. OTC peels in general are for light sunspots and early keratosis. I would recommend seeing a plastic surgeon or dermatologist who can tailor the depth and type of treatment as required.

Larry S. Nichter, MD, MS, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 45 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.