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Eyelash Extensions Seem to Have Damaged my Hair Texture, How Can I Fix This?

I got eyelash extensions on the 25th of June. A proper salon, with good reviews. Loss some, others curled down, it looked funny, so I had them removed on the 5th of August. I have lost the tips of my eyelashes totally and when applied mascara, the mascara (new) clumps over the hair. Could the texture of my eyelashes have changed because of the glue? Or maybe the extensions where too aggressive? I am using latisse but, is there anything someone can recommend me to fix this?

Doctor Answers (3)

Eye lash extensions not recommended

+2

I do not recommend eye lash extensions. By using Latisse, you are moving in the right direction. It will take 4-6 weeks to see results from Latisse when used properly without lash extensions. Hang in there.


Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Eyelash extensions

+1

Thank you for your question. Eyelash extensions can cause damage to the natural lash, just like hair extensions or fake nails it takes time for your natural lashes to recover from the application. Using Latisse is a good step towards speeding up the process. You will most likely have to wait 4 to 6 weeks before you start to notice the improvements. In the future I would recommend sticking with Latisse to improve your volume and length.

- Best wishes

Pablo Prichard, MD
Phoenix Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

Eyelash Extensions

+1

Eyelash extensions may cause issues with the eyelid skin and your natural lashes. Products such as Latisse, which stimulate longer, darker, fuller lashes is always a reasonable and viable option. You might want to give it a try.  I hope this helps.

Leslie M. Sims, MD
Las Vegas Ophthalmologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

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