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Will the Bump and Nose on my Nose Go Away After Swelling?

I had nose surgery and got the bump on my nose bridge shaved down about 5 days ago. The doctor took off the splint today and I first noticed that the nose was not completely straight. It appears like i still have a slight bump/curve, but the doctor says its due to the swelling. once the swelling comes down, it will look straight, or so he says.. Any thoughts that this is true?

Doctor Answers (8)

Will Bump on Nose Go Away When Swelling is Decreased

+1

    The bump may very well go away with time.  The plastic surgeon can feel if this is swelling or residual deformity.  Trust the plastic surgeon. 


Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 180 reviews

Rhinoplasty final result usually visible at four months

+1

Hi.

Much much too early to worry.  Trust your surgeon.  The nose can change pretty dramatically in a few months.

George J. Beraka, MD (retired)
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Will the bump on my nose disappear after the swelling goes down?

+1

Swelling following rhinoplasty can cause some asymmetry. From here, it is important to be patient while you heal, as the final result will not be evident for some time. In general, the final result of a rhinoplasty is not evident for 18-24 months following surgery. 70% of the swelling is resolved after the first 3 months, and the remainder goes down over time. 5 days is very soon after your surgery, and you are right around the peak of your swelling, where it is not abnormal to notice irregularities. I would recommend speaking with your surgeon regarding any immediate post-operative concerns. I hope this helps, and I wish you the best of luck with the reminder of your recovery. 

Paul S. Nassif, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 29 reviews

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Bump on nose

+1

It is very possible that a bump you see just as the spling comes off is swelling. give it time to heal and re-evaluate.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Early asymmetry following a rhinoplasty

+1

It is really hard to answer this question without a photograph or examination but in generally I would not get too excited about early asymmetry following a rhinoplasty.  It definitely takes time for the soft tissue swelling to subside and it will not do so symmetrically.  Follow the advice of your plastic surgeon for an optimal result.  

Jeffrey Zwiren, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
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Will the Bump and Nose on my Nose Go Away After Swelling?

+1

 If you are concerned about the dorsal bump, you should discuss this with your Rhinoplasty Surgeon but 5 days after a Rhinoplasty is way to soon to see any type of final result.  

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Bump after rhinoplasty

+1

Dear dre_h,

  • Try pushing down on the bump to see if the swelling goes away
  • Do not worry if the nose is not completely straight, it probably won't be right after surgery from all of the swelling
  • What he is telling you is true, it just takes some patience

Best regards,

Nima Shemirani
 

Nima Shemirani, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 22 reviews

Post-op swelling

+1

Dear Dre,

 

Without any pictures, I can't definitively answer you.  Post-op swelling after a rhinoplasty can take more than 6 months to resolve (although most of it should improve significantly by 6 weeks).  Your surgeon is the best person to know if the bump you see now is just post-op swelling.  If your surgeon can compress the area and make the bump go away, then I would be more inclined to think that it IS just swelling.

 

Best,

Asif Pirani, MD, FRCS(C)

Asif Pirani, MD, FRCS(C)
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.