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Chickenpox Scar Permanent Solution? Fillers? (photo)

I have quite a few chickenpox scar on my face that affects my selfesteem. I've included pictures to seek for some expert advice. I'm asian, very prone to post scar reddening, and somewhat easy to form thick scar tissue. I've met about 4 surgeons to consult about the scar, but still hope to seek for more opinions. I prefer fillers since they don't leave scar behind like the actual scar removal surgery. I heard about Artefill, which is permanent, what is your opinion on it? Thanks in advance.

Doctor Answers (3)

Treatment for chicken pox scars on forehead

+2

I would say that you have two options to treat the chicken pox scars on your forehead.  You could have surgery to excise them, or you could have a filler injected to try and raise them so that they are not as depressed.  There are several different types of fillers, including Artefill, that could be used.  My recommendation would be to try Radiesse first.  This way, you would be able to see immediately if there was an improvement from the filler.  The results would not be permanent, but could last a year.  Artefill is a stimulatory agent and would require multiple treatment sessions to achieve a result.  Since Artefill is a stimulatory agent, and Radiesse has more bulk to it, it's possible that you would get more lift from the Radiesse than from the Artefill.


San Francisco Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Scars

+1

It is unlikely even if you are asian to get hypertrophic scars on the forehead. Anything is possible though. Excision is the best choice in my opinion

Norman Bakshandeh, MD, FACS
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Chicken pox scars on the forehead and nose

+1

Scar excision and layered closure; followed by fractional co2 laser skin resurfacing will help these scars. 

Raffy Karamanoukian, MD, FACS
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 46 reviews

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