Options on Dealing with Rippling of Implants?

Hi i got saline implants almost a year ago im 5'3 118lbs and they are 390cc filled to 450cc making me a full C cup i was an A. now both of my breasts have rippling on the medial and lateral sides. what are my options and if i go back in to have them re-done its is going to be more painful a longer recovery? anything i should know before i decide to go through it again?

Doctor Answers (7)

Options on Dealing with Rippling of Implants?

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Regarding: "Options on Dealing with Rippling of Implants?
Hi i got saline implants almost a year ago im 5'3 118lbs and they are 390cc filled to 450cc making me a full C cup i was an A. now both of my breasts have rippling on the medial and lateral sides. what are my options and if i go back in to have them re-done its is going to be more painful a longer recovery? anything i should know before i decide to go through it again
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If you go through the RealSelf logs you will see that your problem is one of the most common complications seen with breast implants. It appears that all the facts associated with breast implants are either not taught to or not understood and adhered to by the women having breast implants.

ALL breast implants ripple. There is no ripple-free implant on the market. If you are going to have implants, you must accept SOME rippling. But, there are ways to minimize rippling. Saline filled and textured implants ripple worse than silicone gel filled and smooth surface implants. Placement under the muscle and using implants which can be covered by your present  breast tissue will minimize palpable and visible rippling. On the other hand, using implants which extend outside the breast cover where they are just under the skin assures visibility of the ripples. In summary, if you want the worst possible ripples have large / wide textured saline implants placed over the muscle - if you want the least possible rippling have carefully selected smooth silicone gel filled implants under the muscle.

In your case, I would choose the smallest silicone gel filled implant you can live with, under the muscle, if needed covered along the lower pole with either Alloderm or Strattice.

Dr. Peter Aldea


Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 58 reviews

Options for breast implant rippling

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AS Dr. Vitenas has excellently reviewed the options, your choices are: downsizing, conversion to silicone (with persistent possiblity of rippling but probably less), biologic tissue layers such as Alloderm, fat grafting, complete implant removal and replacement with smaller volume of fat. Transition oto a submuscular pocket will not necessarily eliminate inferior and medial rippling.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 41 reviews

Dealing with Rippling of Implants

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The problem you describe is a very common one in thin patients. Options for you to consider are switching to silicone implants, sub-muscular placement, fat grafting and the use of an acellular dermal matrix such as AlloDerm or Stratice. I would recommend that you find a surgeon you are comfortable with and let them guide you through this process.

Paul Vitenas, Jr., MD
Houston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 37 reviews

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Breast augmentation

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Tough problem to solve completely.  The problem,as you describe it, has occurred because you do not adequate tissue to cover the implants.  Implant rippling occurs less often when under the muscle, but in the areas that muscles do no not cover (sides, lower poles, and sometime medially), fat grafting may help, or AlloDerm.  It will be costly.

Shahin Javaheri, MD
San Francisco Plastic Surgeon
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Breast Implant Rippling

+1

Excellent question.

Rippling is a very common sequelae following breast augmentation, especially in very thin patients with little pre-operative breast tissue. In my experience, rippling is also more noticeable in sub-glandular breast augmentations.  Your options are as follows: You could opt to exchange your implants for silicone implants. Doing so may not completely eradicate the rippling, but modest to significant improvement will be seen. Secondly,  you may want to consider using a tissue matrix such as Alloderm or Strattice. These products can be used to line the breast along the areas of rippling to help provide extra coverage between the implant and overlying breast tissue. The results tend to to be good to excellent.  The limiting factor in this procedure is that these products tend to be quite costly, making the procedure prohibitively expensive for all but a handful of patients.

Best of luck,

Glenn Vallecillos, MD, FACS

Glenn Vallecillos, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

Rippling correction

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May surgeons would have you switch into silicone implants but you very well may have rippling. Many are now suggesting alloderm to add another layer to the soft tissue coverage but it is quite expensive.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.