Ask a doctor

Open Wound Under Breast and Sensation in Legs. Can It Be Nerve Pain or DVT in Legs? (photo)

I had surgery at the end of July. 1 wk later I had an open wound under right breast. I went back to PS and he said use non stick dressing and triple antibiotics BID. Then three days later the left breast starting dripping blood. I gave pressure and put ointment on with dressing. I've noticed I have sensation in legs. Could it be from going a couple of weeks without Lyrica for FM or maybe a DVT? He said go to the ER but I'm nervous.

Doctor Answers (4)

Open Wound Under Breast and Sensation in Legs. Can It Be Nerve Pain or DVT in Legs?

+2

Your surgeon is correct GO TO THE ER!!! A DVT event is very seru=ious and could be life threatening!!!


Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 62 reviews

Open Wound Under Breast and Sensation in Legs. Can It Be Nerve Pain or DVT in Legs

+2

If there is reasonable suspicion of a DVT, an evaluation is mandatory. This is a health and life threatening problem, that is readily treatable. Follow your surgeon's advice. 

All the best. 

Jourdan Gottlieb, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Ruleout DVT

+1

DVT is a life and death manner.  I would not waste time in getting to the ER as every second counts.    

In terms of your wound, it appears to have a lot of tension.   I would recommend aggressive local wound care and frequent followup with your surgeon.   Once healed, you may be a candidate for a scar/breast revision.

Dr. Gill

Paul S. Gill, MD
Houston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 35 reviews

You might also like...

DVT? in leg

+1

If there is any suspicion of a deep vein thrombosis, then your surgeon is right to have you evaluated at the hospital.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.