Hard Nose Tip After Rhinoplasty

I underwent an open Rhinoplasty four years ago come this August. I had previously had a very small nose with almost no bridge, and the surgery basically built a bridge (with silicone) and elongated my nose. The doctor used ear cartilage for the tip. I did this surgery in Seoul, South Korea with a very reputable doctor. The nose is fine and looks natural–no uneven spots or any droops or bumps. The tip, however, is unnaturally hard. It doesn't hurt when touched, but should it still be unyielding?

Doctor Answers (3)

Silicone Use in Nasal Surgery

+1

"The nose is fine and looks natural". This is what you wanted to achieve. I would not worry about a firm tip.

Although you say cartilage was used in the tip, it may be your feeling some of the silicone. Often an L-shaped piece of silicone is used, especially when trying to elongate the nose. Cartilage grafts may also cause firmness.

Don't worry. Enjoy the appearance of your nose.


Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Hard tip after Rhinoplasty can happen

+1

Based on what you have written, it seems that there was a lot of work done to your tip and that this involved ear cartilage grafts. It is not unusual for the tip to remain very firm even after a long time. As long as it is not painful and is not causing you any other symptoms it should not be a problem.

John Diaz, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Ear cartilage grafts can be very firm in nose

+1

The ear caritlage can be stiffer and harder than native nose cartilage and may remain very firm. It otherwise sounds fine and I would not be concerned.

The fact that you can feel it means that it has survived which is a good thing.

Rarely the graft and become encapsulated and make the graft more visible.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 48 reviews

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