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Best Ointment for Scarring After Mole Removal?

I am 23 years old, and I had 2 moles cut from my face and stitched back up last week. The stitches have already been removed, and the plastic surgeon gave me "Pro-Heal Serum Advanced" from iS Clinical to use for scar prevention, but I have read that Aquaphor works as good as any scar ointment. I told the nurses that I have been using Aquaphor and they insisted I stopped using Aquaphor and switched to the Pro-Heal. What should I use, and for how long should I apply it? Thanks!

Doctor Answers (3)

Mole removal in Los Angeles

+1

Both seem to be suitable options in the short term.  I would seek the advice of your surgeon, and since they recommend the first cream, this may be a suitable option for your scar. 


Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 47 reviews

Post-care treatment

+1

The best thing that you can do to aid wound healing is to keep it moist and to minimize it's exposure to the sun.  

Sam Naficy, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 141 reviews

Best treatments to prevent scarring

+1

Extensive studies of wound healing in animal testing has shown that keeping an excision site "moist" will help promote healing and minimize scarring. Therefore letting a wound become dry and scabby would be detrimental to healing. There are no other magic ingredients to minimize scarring although lots of money is spent on products that do little more than keeping the area moist. I instruct all of my patients to apply petroleum jelly after a surgical procedure. Aquaphor is also a great product and worth the few dollars more. Antibiotic ointments and expensive healing serums are unnecessary and a waste of money.

Mitchell Schwartz, MD
South Burlington Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

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