NUSS Procedure or Breast Augmentation for Pectus Excavatum? (photo)

I am a 19 year old female with mild pectus excavatum, that is assymatrical. Hence my right breast is A/B cup and my left side is almost concave looking. I am reluctant to do the NUSS procedure because of the scars and also fear of a complications from the invasive surgery. I understand breast augmentation is likely to be less invasive and has less complications, would a breast enhancement surgery work for me?

Doctor Answers (2)

Breast Augmentation for Pectus

+2

Pectus excavatum is not that uncommon.  Many patients with a pectus can benefit from simply placing breast implants. See Dr. Pousti's answer also, which is great.   I have done maybe ten patients in the past year with anatomy similar to yours.  The main concern is not to make the implant pocket too close to the midline of the breast bone, so as not to end up with a "uniboob" or synmastia.  The differences from one side to the other will remain after your surgery, but the volume difference can be improved.  I commonly make the incision in the armpit to avoid a "cut" on the breast.

All the best!  "Dr. Joe"


Minneapolis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 66 reviews

Breast Augmentation and Pectus Excavatum?

+2

Thank you for the question and pictures.

I think you'll be better off with a breast augmentation procedure for the reasons you mentioned. Given your body type I would suggest sub muscular ( dual plane)  silicone gel breast implants.   I have found that,  for patients with pectus excavatum,  the use of different size and/or profile silicone gel implants greatly improve symmetry and helps to camouflage the pectus  excavatum.

You may find the link below helpful.

Happy Holidays!

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 794 reviews

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