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I have always wanted a nose job to remove the hump. Am I a candidate for a Nose Job? (photos)

I have always wanted a nose job to remove the hump.  I like the indent now but the bump hurts. I felt like when my hair was lighter it didn't draw as much attention to it but here I am with dark hair again and all I see is the bump. I went to an ear nose and throat and found out I have a deviated septum and he wanted to shave the bump and fix the indent. I don't know what to do and am just looking for honest answers.

Doctor Answers (10)

Rhinoplasty is not a simple operation. Make sure you see an expert.

+3

An Ear, Nose and Throat/Otolaryngologist - Head and Neck Surgeon, is well versed in managing problems of the head and neck - including those of the nose.  While many Otolaryngologists are very experienced rhinoplasty surgeons, it is up to you to ensure you are entrusting your nose to an expert.  

That expert could very well be an Otolaryngologist, a general Plastic Surgeon, or a Facial Plastic Surgeon (an Otolaryngologist who has done a year of specialized training in Facial cosmetic procedures including Rhinoplasty).  

Questions you need to ask your surgeon include:

- how often do you perform rhinoplasty?

- do you do it primarily for functional reasons (breathing) or for cosmetic reasons?

- do you have before and after photos?  

These questions are the bare minimum things I would encourage you to inquire about.  Look at the before and after photos and especially those demonstrating results several years out.  

Based on your photos, my impression is that you have a dorsal hump , widely separated nasal domes, and a slight deviation of your nose to the left - I would require standard rhinoplasty photos/views to make any further comments.  All of these areas can be modified to make you happier with your appearance.  The greatest challenge you face is that you also have what appears to be very thin skin (your cartilages are easily seen through your skin) - of course I would need to examine you to determine if this is truly the case.  That being said, performing a rhinoplasty on a thin-skinned patient requires excellent technique and experience.  Every minor lump or bump will show through your skin and thus your surgery has to be perfect for you to achieve the results you desire.  This absolutely mandates you see an experienced rhinoplasty surgeon.  

I would encourage you to seek out an experienced Rhinoplasty surgeon in your area or consider traveling. 


Toronto Facial Plastic Surgeon

Honest answers about your nose and a Rhinoplasty

+2

 I have performed Rhinoplasty for over 20 years and IMHO, your nose has quite a large dorsal hump, the nose is slightly crooked and the nasal tip has prominent cartilages with a deep cleft.  Honestly, you are a very pretty girl and your nose is not helping your appearance in any manner. 

 Rhinoplasty would reduce the nasal hump, straighten the nose, thin the nasal tip at which time, if you really wanted to keep the cleft...it could be left intact.

 Select your Rhinoplasty surgeon based on experience and reputation and not merely who happens to be the closest to your house. 

Hope this helps.

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

A narrow preoperative nose can cause a new airway obstruction after rhinoplasty

+2

I see not only the bump but also the fact that the middle third of your nose is narrower than the top or bottom.  This is the internal valve area.  Its importance is not only as a site of possible airway obstruction now,  but also what will happen after your bump is removed.

The bump that  you don't like is holding the sides out. If a surgeon takes off the bump and does nothing else your middle third will narrow further (because there is now nothing to keep the sides apart), and your airway will get worse.  This is why so many patients breathe better before rhinoplasty than afterward.

Your surgeon can avoid the postoperative obstruction by placing valvular (spreader) grafts into the valves using the cartilage that is already being removed form your septum.

You also have thin skin and strong cartilages.  This allows you to get a more delicate result than a thick-skinned patient, but makes it more possible to have visible postoperative imperfections.

Find a surgeon whom you trust who is very good at airway management and grafts.  Good luck.

Mark B. Constantian, MD, FACS
Nashua Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

Nose job

+1

Shaving the bump will help achieve more harmony to the nose.  It can be performed the same time

as the deviated septum surgery. But if you dont have signs of nasal obstruction, im not sure why the ENT

is suggesting that it be corrected.

Elliot M. Heller, MD
New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 36 reviews

Nose bump and septoplasty

+1

You can easily do both procedures at the same time. You may have additional charges for the cosmetic portion. There is no reason not to proced with a single operation.

David A. Bray, Sr., MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Nasal bump reduction and septoplasty

+1

A septoplasty procedure is performed to repair and straighten the nasal septum. The septum represents the natural inside division between the two sides of the nose. Although not clearly visible, the nose septum plays a crucial role in both nasal function and appearance. Therefore, a septum that is misshapen and deviated can contribute to nasal breathing obstruction and certain nasal deformities. Many times septoplasty is preformed during rhinoplasty to correct nasal obstructions and circumvent possible post rhinoplasty breathing problem.  If your surgeon recommends a septorhinoplasty, that is a common procedure. Good luck. Dr. Kevin Sadati

Kevin Sadati, DO
Orange County Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 101 reviews

Nose Job

+1

If you want to improve you nasal appearance by removing the hump and correcting the "indent"  you can achieve your goals with a  rhinoplasty by an experienced surgeon. When necessary, a septoplasty is frequently done at the same time.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Nose Job?

+1

I am often asked a similar question and my answer is if it bothers you enough, then you can do something about it. In your case rhinoplasty will balance your profile and refine your nasal tip. If you do have breathing difficulty, then septoplasty will improve that too.

Mohsen Tavoussi, MD, DO
Huntington Beach Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Septal and nasal surgery

+1

Your nasal bump and indentation can be fixed with rhinoplasty. Not all septal deviations need to be addressed.

If you don't experience difficulty in nasal breathing  , you don't have symptoms related to to nasal obstruction  nor obvious external deformity secondary to the deviation then you can just proceed with the nasal reshaping alone.

Erel Laufer, MD
Tampa Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

A Comprehensive Approach To Septorhinoplasty

+1

I think your personal assessment of the shape of your nose is very accurate. Your nasal shape issues of a dorsal hump,uneven dorsal profile line, and excessive tip projection with a bifid tip are all problems that rhinoplasty does well at improving. Given that you have been evaluated and determined to have a septal deviation, than a combined septorhinoplasty is a good operation for you to make an overall improvement.  It is important that a complete approach to your nose be done and it is rarely as simple as a 'bump shaving'  and 'fixing the indent' alone will result in the best overal nasal appearance change. Get several different opinions in your area and get some computer imaging done to be sure you are making all the changes that will give you the best looking nose after surgery.

Barry L. Eppley, MD, DMD
Indianapolis Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.