If I get a nose job, wouldn't the space between the bottom of my nose and my lip be too long?

So, I'm sure most of you have heard of the horizontal thirds and vertical fifths. The 1st third of my face (forehead to brow ridge) is equal to the 3rd third of my face (bottom of nose to lip). The middle third of my face is slightly longer than the other two. And my nose isn't horrible. I just feel that it's a little long (in vertical direction - not upwards). However, if I shorten it, wouldn't I need a lip lift as well to fill up the extra space? Also, would I need cheek augmentation too?

Doctor Answers (8)

Upper lip appearance and rhinoplasty

+1
The space between your upper lip and your nose does not have to change if the rotation of the tip is maintained at the same angle.
You need a consultation and computer imaging to address this, and requests the changes that you are looking for.

BEst,


Houston Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 78 reviews

Facial Proportions

+1
You are asking a complex question that cannot be answered without photos and a physical examination.You would benefit from computer simulation so you can get an idea of potential results.

Jay M. Pensler, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

If I get a nose job, wouldn't the space between the bottom of my nose and my lip be too long?

+1
You are asking complex questions about shape and proportions on your face. There is no way anyone can give you a meaningful answer without an exam or photos. But it would be quite unusual and unexpected to see any change in distance from the nasal base to the lip.

Ronald V. DeMars, MD
Portland Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

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If I get a nose job, wouldn't the space between the bottom of my nose and my lip be too long?

+1

Natural appearing rhinoplasties should be in harmony with the other facial features and need to be individualized since every patient is different.

Keep in mind that following the advice from a surgeon on this or any other website who proposes to tell you exactly what to do without seeing photos and without examining you, physically feeling the tissue, assessing your desired outcome, taking a full medical history, and discussing the pros and cons of each operative procedure would not be in your best interest. I would suggest you find a plastic surgeon certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery and ideally a member of the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS) or facial plastic surgeon (ENT) that you trust and are comfortable with. You should discuss your concerns with that surgeon in person.

Robert Singer, MD FACS

La Jolla, California

Robert Singer, MD
La Jolla Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Lip Lift with Rhinoplasty

+1
I cannot answer your question without pictures or an examination. Over the past 35 years I've never treated 2 noses exactly the same; every surgery is individualized.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Rhinoplasty question

+1
The proportions of the different segments of your nose can be balanced. It is important that you seek someone experienced, and view the before/after photos of the patients.

Stefan Rene Adair, MD
Sarasota Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Symmetry

+1
Interesting question but without an exam and photos to show how you might look after surgery it is impossible to make an intelligent recommendation. Go for a consultation with more then one PS and get their opinions after an examination and digital photography. Dr. Corbin

Frederic H. Corbin, MD
Brea Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

If I get a nose job, wouldn't the space between the bottom of my nose and my lip be too long?

+1
  Possibly, but a description alone cannot replace an exam to make this determination.

Kenneth Hughes, MD

Los Angeles, CA

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 203 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.