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Nose Hits From Baby. Could These Cause Damage?

I'm 12 wks post op rhino & have been tryin really hard to protect my nose, however I have had a few nudges and taps on my nose due to my 1 yr old and at night when I'm sleeping my husband has accidentally hit my nose when he moves. I have never felt pain from any of my little accidents, maybe just like a tingle from my nose tip bein still so numb. My question is what kind of hit would it take to actually do damage to my nose? And could these minor hits be making my nose weak each time they occur

Doctor Answers (9)

Baby Nudges The Nose After Rhinoplasty

+1

Hi,

It is not possible to provide with a scale depicting the threshold intensity of a nasal trauma that will cause a damage to patients after a rhinoplasty.

With that perspective and based on your description, it seems that the nasal incidents were not vulgar and they did not insult the results of your surgery.

However, without physical examination it is hard to confirm and/or provide you with a solid diagnosis.

I recommend that you consult with your surgeon who will be able to assess if there were to be any damage caused by the nudges you have been subjected to.

Meanwhile, I encourage you to be more careful protecting your nose.

I hope this helps.

Thank you for our inquiry.

The best of wishes to you.

Dr. Sajjadian


Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 117 reviews

Baby Hits Nose Post Rhinoplasty

+1

It is very unlikely you have done any harm to your nose. You do not want to know how hard it would be to damage your surgical result; it is best that you try to avoid all nasal trauma.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Nose Hits From Baby. Could These Cause Damage?

+1

 It's not uncommon for my post Rhinoplasty patients to be very scared about any contact to their nose within the first 3-6 months following the Rhinoplasty.  Truth is, the nose after 1 month isn't as delicate as patients imagine.  My rule of thumb is, if you feel sharp pain, hear a crack or have bleeding after an impact, damage may have occurred.  Of course, you should ask your Rhinoplasty Surgeon for specifics.

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

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Rambunctious Rhino

+1

Twelve weeks post-op: In general, periosteal & perichondrial healing have given your nasal bones & cartilage substantial structural support (well over 80%).  Minor trauma is not likely to be an issue, but sleeping accidents, falling, aggressive hugging, wild baby maneuvers and sports injuries associated with obvious ecchymosis (bruising), epistaxis (nose bleed), nasal airway compromise or topographical deformity are always important concerns.

 

Stay well.........stay vigilant for the first six months after surgery!

 

Robert A. Shumway, MD, FACS

Robert Shumway, MD
San Diego Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Beware of the "Head Throw Back" Move...Minor Nose Trauma Following Rhinoplasty

+1

Hi,

I warn my post-rhinoplasty moms with small children to beware of the dreaded "reverse back of the head to the new nose" move that many babies have perfected.  It occurs when the child is sitting on the mother's lap, and for no apparent reason the baby decides to send the back of their sweet baby head directly into the usually unsuspecting, sleep deprived, and distracted mom's nose.  You have been warned!

Minor bumps to the nose following rhinoplasty are quite common.  Fortunately, the nasal bones are fairly well healed approximately 3 weeks after surgery.  These minor hits will not make your nose weak.  As for your husband, a solid male elbow to your schnoz could cause damage.  Either get a new sleeping partner who is less restless, or ask your rhinoplasty surgeon for a protective cast.  We usually ask our patients to tape their splint on their nose at bedtime for the first two to three weeks post rhinoplasty.

At 12 weeks after your surgery it would take a significant blow to your nose to cause damage, a blow that would likely cause injury whether or not you had surgery.  Enjoy your new nose and new baby!

Good luck and be well.

Dr. P

Michael A. Persky, MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Trauma after rhinoplasty

+1

Little bumps as such wont do any da,age but the nose after rhinoplasty is a delicate balance of skin bones and cartilage each resting on itself.It is very possible even if there is no pain to move a structure or change the result. I recommend in the sporting goods store a basketball nose guard. Not exactly like Kobe wore but similar The nose is above 75% strength at 6 weeks. Otherwise be careful

Richard Ellenbogen, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Minor bumps to the nose following rhinoplasty.

+1

Hi babygirl.  I agree with the other surgeons that at this stage it would take a substantial blow to cause significant damage and you would experience bleeding, bruising etc. with obvious changes to the shape of your nose.  If you have any concerns, please contact your surgeon.

Sincerely, Mario J. Imola, MD, DDS, FRCSC.

Mario J. Imola, MD, DDS
Denver Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 46 reviews

Shape of nose is stable 12 weeks after rhinoplasty.

+1

Hi.

If you did any real harm, you would see a change in the shape of your nose as well as nosebleed and pain.

George J. Beraka, MD (retired)
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Hits to nose after rhinoplasty

+1

I don't think you did in any damage. Noses are vulnerable for 6 weeks after surgery. This is when the early scar tissue is forming. After six weeks weeks the scar tissue should hold everything into position in spite of minor trauma. I would only worry if you get hit hard enough to  cause real bruising.

Ronald Schuster, MD
Baltimore Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.