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Nose Fracture from Trauma on Funfair Ride- How To Treat Resulting Bump? (photo)

I had a bad accident on a funfair ride, my face smacked of a bar about 4 months ago in which I suffered I got a small nasal non-dislocated fracture. The main issue of concern is a small bump on the right side of my nose which gives the appearance of a hump. What options surgical or non do I have to treat this issue? even though its small it is effecting my self confidence. Many thanks for your advice :)

Doctor Answers (2)

Nasal Bump After Trauma

+1

Caroline, I do see a slight convexity, or bump, as viewed from the photo provided. This type of abnormality is quite common following the type of trauma you described. I would likely recommend a closed procedure where no external incisions are made. The bump can likely be shaved down during a procedure that can be done on an outpatient basis with limited recovery when compared with a standard rhinoplasty procedure. You need to consult with a board certified facial plastic surgeon who has experience in both functional and cosmetic nose surgery to give you the best possible chance for a successful outcome. In a good majority of these cases, you health insurance can be used to cover the costs associated with this type of surgery. Good luck.


San Diego Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Nasal Bump Following Trauma

+1

You have waited long enough to consider possible treatment following your nasal trauma. I'm sorry, but the bump is not real clear in the picture I'm seeing. A bump can be reduced or excised depending on whether it is caused by bone, cartilage, or deep scar tissue. Specific recommendations will be made after examination of your nose.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

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