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Will Nose Appear Different After Getting Bumped 6 Months After Rhinoplasty Surgery?

Yesterday as I zipped up my jacket, a girl picked up something she'd dropped, and as she got up, she accidently headbutted me in my nose, forcefully pushing up and in. I underwent rhinoplasty at the very end of June, (just got bump shaved down) and I was very happy with the results but after getting bumped, my nose appears to have a bump from only one angle-view, and is a little swollen in the bridge and one side of my nose. Will it go down? I'm really worried it won't return to how it was.

Doctor Answers (7)

Trauma to the nose after surgery

+2

By 6 months out from rhinoplasty, your nose should be well healed and the force required to break your nose would be essentially the same as if you had never had nasal surgery. After rhinoplasty, I usually advise my patients that after 6-8 weeks, they may resume contact sports (basketball, football etc.) in which the risk of getting hit in the nose is fairly high.

All that being said, significant trauma to the nose, as you have described, could certainly change its shape. I would recommend applying ice to your nose for the first 24-48 hours and then making an appointment to see your surgeon within a few days. If you did rebreak your nasal bones, your surgeon may be able to straighten them by simply pushing them back into place (closed reduction) before they heal in a crooked fashion. 

Best,

Dr. Mehta


Bay Area Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Nasal trauma after rhinoplasty

+1

Six months after your rhinoplasty, your nasal bones should be completely healed and not susceptible to reinjury from minor trauma to the nose. Some asymmetry in swelling may result in the bump you describe only on one view of your nose. If you are concerned about the appearance of your nose, you should contact your surgeon for an examination.

Olivia Hutchinson, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Nasal Trauma After Rhinoplasty

+1

In the absence of a new nasal fracture (broken nose) or dislodging of the septum from underneath the nasal  bones, minimal trauma to the bridge of the nose should not cause and permanent changes to the shape of the nose. It is fairly common for uneven swelling to result from a forceful blow to the nose -- this may take several weeks to resolve.

Please follow-up with your surgeon and have him evaluate your nose to make certain that no permanent damage was done.

C. Spencer Cochran, MD
Dallas Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 91 reviews

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Can bump to nose 6 months after rhinoplasty affect results?

+1

To cause permanent change to your nose it would take quite a bit of force at this stage. It sounds like no controlled bone fractures were done at the time of your surgery, but even if there were they'd be healed by now.

I would certainly recommend visiting with your surgeon to just make sure, though. Icing the area in the meantime may help with the swelling you're noticing.

Thomas A. Lamperti, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Trauma 6 Months after Rhinoplasty

+1

I is unlikely you did any permanent harm. I would  expect the nose to be swollen 24 hours after trauma. Put your mind at rest and see your surgeon.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Bump on nose

+1

If you just sustained a bruise to your nose, it may be nothing. I would give it some time to see if it resolves before worrying too much.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Accidently bumping nose after rhinoplasty.

+1

You should make an appointment and show your doctor right away.  Just to be on the safe side since it is swollen.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 48 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.