Is It Normal That the Edges of my Two Front (Rebonded) Teeth Are Stained, Had It Done Well over Ten Years Ago? (photo)

I rarely smoke, and I would of thought if it was due to this, the discoloration would begin to show on the bottom row of teeth as to the top, and where my teeth had been rebuilt?!

Doctor Answers (4)

Is Staining Normal Around Bonding?

+1

This is rather large bonding and after ten years it is completely normal to have some staining.  It looks as though your best option would be to have to porcelain veneers placed.  These will aesthetically look much better and will not stain like dental bonding.  Good luck. 


Houston Cosmetic Dentist
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Stained Bonding

+1

Stained bonding on the teeth are very common, especially after a few years. Polishing can help removed external stain. To avoid this problem, porcelain veneers are the best option or you can continue to replace the bonding every couple years.

Svetlana Novak, DMD
Natick Cosmetic Dentist

Staining

+1

Sometimes you can poish off some of the stain as a temporary improvement but a ceramic restoration will not stain in that manner.  Coffee, tea and just everday life can cause the composite to discolor.  

Ira Shapira, DDS
Lake Forest Cosmetic Dentist

You might also like...

Stained Bonding

+1

It is normal for bonding to be stained after 10 years of service.  5-7 years is a realistic expectation of the lifespan of bonding.  It will vary from case to case depending on diet, tea, coffee, smoking, red wine, etc.  Having them polished periodically can prolong the lifespan somewhat as well.  Your solution will be to have the bonding replaced or make the switch to porcelain veneers which have the advantage of never staining.

Donald L. Wilcox, DDS
Phoenix Cosmetic Dentist
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.