Is It Normal to Have a Sunken Area After Mole is Excised/Removed?

Atypical-Severe mole was removed from the center of my back (shoulder blades) on Feb. 16. It was located to the right of my spine, so the incission goes across my spine & about 2 inches long. The mole removed was flat & shaped like Texas, so it was definately larger than a pencil eraser. My concern is the area that's sunken above my stitches. Is that normal? Please tell that will go away.

Doctor Answers (2)

Sunken area from mole removal

+2

I always tell my patients that it can take between 6 months to one year for a scar to completely heal before judging the final result. This is especially true when surgery is done on the back where the skin is extremely thick and scars tend to stretch significantly over time, regardless of how precisely the surgery was done. As your surgery was so recent, your scar will most likely improve over time.


South Burlington Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Depressed area after Mole Removal

+2

First, if you had a severely atypical mole or nevus, it was absolutely necessary that the lesion be removed. Severely atypical nevi are benign lesions but have enough atypical features that they should be removed to avoid the possibility that the lesion might be changing to a melanoma and to avoid the possibility that the biopsy sample viewed under the microscope might actually be a melanoma (i.e. sample error).

Now, regarding the depressed area, frequently the depressed area may fill in with time. It takes 6-12 months to get the final cosmetic result for any scar. Sometimes scars on the trunk, especially over the spine or over large joints (e.g. shoulder or knee) may widen over time. It would likely flatten out more at that time as well. Best option is to have the doctor who performed the surgery evaluate how it is healing and give you some input. Best of luck.

Andrew Kaufman, MD
Los Angeles Dermatologic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.