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Is It Normal to Feel a Bit Harder on a Breast Which Had a Hetatoma Removal After Breast Implant? (photo)

I had my breast implant 1 and half months. My right breast had a Hematoma occurred 2 weeks ago. It's been 2 weeks after the removal of hematoma surgery on right breast. I feel my right breast isn't as soft as my left breast, my nipples look different and also my right implants sit a little bit higher. Is it normally like that? or does it take more time to soften my right breast? I am worried if that's a beginning of a capsular contracture or a small hematoma will be happen soon! Thanks Doctor

Doctor Answers (7)

Harder Breast after Hematoma Removal

+1

 Blood is an irritant to tissues and increases the swelling and the time until final recovery.  The breast may be hard initially during the early phase of wound healing, but this usually softens from months 3 to 12.  Capsular contracture can occur, but the hardness is progressive.


Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 237 reviews

Hematoma and Firmness after Breasts Augmentation?

+1

I'm sorry to hear about the complication you experienced after breast augmentation surgery. It sounds like your plastic surgeon has treated you appropriately and that you are on your  way to achieving a very nice result.

 Although some additional firmness is to be expected on the side where the hematoma was drained, I would suggest that you check with your plastic surgeon to see what he/she recommends to help prevent encapsulation of the breast implants, given your history.

 Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 789 reviews

Aggressive Breast Manipulation After Hematoma Removal

+1

It is perfectly normal after hematoma or fluid evacuation around a breast implant that it feels differently, more hard and the implant may even appear a little high/malpositioned compared to the other unaffected softer more natural side. This will usually get better but it is best to intiate early massage and deeper energy therapies such as ultrasound to guard against scar tissue formation that will make it stay that way.

Barry L. Eppley, MD, DMD
Indianapolis Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

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Is It Normal to Feel a Bit Harder on a Breast Which Had a Hetatoma Removal After Breast Implant?

+1

Though the posted photo after hematoma evacuation appears very similar, the "hardness effect" is the fibrosis from the hematoma and repeat surgery. Best to discuss with your surgeon in detail. I would recommend aggressive massage and external ultrasound therapy. 

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
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Healing changes following a breast augmentation and hematoma

+1

Most hematomas occur very early after surgery but I have seen a hematoma months after a breast augmentation.  The hematoma will definitely slow down teh healing process and can make the breast, at least initially feel firmer.  A hematoma is one of the known causes of a capsular contracture. If you are unsure or need some reassurance you need to see  your plastic surgeon.  

Jeffrey Zwiren, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
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Hematoma late after breast augmentation

+1

It is a bit unusual to have a hematoma a month after breast augmentation.  It may also take a little longer for that breast to settle after the hematoma is removed.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
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One breast feels harder

+1

I think it would be very important to have your surgeon evaluate you.  It wold not be unusual to have some differences for a bit after having a hematoma evacuated, however, your surgeon would best be able to asses whether this is normal healing or a contracture issue.  This soon out, probably just normal healing differences.  Be sure to check with your surgeon sooner than later so you can be reassured.  

Charles R. Nathan, MD
Saint Louis Plastic Surgeon
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These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.