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Should I get Implants with my Breast Lift or do the procedures separately? (photo)

I am currently a 32dd, mY DR SAYS my breast are assymetrical and that I ned a lift and i should only do implanst after the lift heals because my breast could heal diefferently but the last time my breast got engorged from being pregnant they where pretty even so should i just get my breast lift and implants together?..

Doctor Answers (22)

Breast Lift Augmentation/Lifting; One or Two Stages?

+3

Whether the breast lift and augmentation should be done the same time  is not a question agreed-upon by all plastic surgeons. There are good plastic surgeons who will insist on doing the procedures separately and there are good plastic surgeons who can produce excellent outcomes in a single stage.

The combination breast augmentation / mastopexy surgery differs from breast augmentation surgery alone in that it carries increased risk compared to either breast augmentation or mastopexy surgery performed separately. Furthermore, the potential need for revisionary surgery is increased with breast augmentation / mastopexy surgery done at the same time.
In my opinion, the decision  to do the operation in a single or two  staged fashion becomes a judgment call made by a surgeon after direct examination of the patient.  


For me, if I see a patient who needs a great degree of lifting, who has lost a lot of skin elasticity, or  whose goal is a very large augmentation then I think it is best to do the procedures in 2 stages (in order to avoid serious complications). However, doing the procedure in one stage does increase the risks of complications in general and the potential need for further surgery. This increased risk must be weighed against the practical benefits of a single stage procedure (which most patients would prefer).


Conversely, if I see a patient who requires minimal to moderate lifting along with a small to moderate size augmentation (and has good skin quality), then doing the procedure one stage is much safer. Nevertheless, the potential risks  are greater with a 1 stage  procedure and the patient does have a higher  likelihood of needing revisionary surgery.

Ultimately, I think you will be best off selecting the plastic surgeon who you feel will most likely be able to achieve the results you are looking for and follow his/her recommendations.

I hope this helps.


San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 707 reviews

Should I get implants with my breast lift? (photo)

+1
Hello! Thank you for your question!  The mastopexy procedure raises the breast, which ultimately provides a more youthful and perky breasts. This is done by removing the extra loose skin and rearranging the surrounding breast tissue in order to reshape and support the newly formed breast. At the same time, the nipple-areolar complex (NAC) is raised to the ideal position above the fold beneath your breast (the inframammary fold) as well as being placed at the most projecting portion. Oftentimes with age or following pregnancy, the NAC becomes widened and enlarged. This may be reduced in size during the breast lift procedure.

It is common for the breast to lose its firmness and uplifted appearance over time, which is also accentuated with age, pregnancy/breast feeding, weight gain/loss, and gravity. This results in breast ptosis, or sagging of the breast, with a “deflated” appearance. Women seek the mastopexy procedure to regain the previous youthful appearance of her breasts and women report increased confidence, self-esteem, and femininity once achieving this desired shape and fullness. Breast lifts may or may not be performed with implants – the implant would add increased size but also greater fullness in the upper pole of the breasts which creates more cleavage.  I believe that a combination of an implant with a breast lift would be the ideal procedures for you given your photos as you do have some degree of ptosis (droop) already along with a deficiency of the upper pole of your breast.  Hope that this helps!

Lewis Albert Andres, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Breast lift and augmentation can be done in the one stage

+1

Thanks for your question and for supplying your photo. Your current breast size is DD. If are happy with that volume, but you are unhappy with the shape of your breasts, then a breast lift (mastopexy) is the right procedure for you. This involves rearranging the breast tissue and lifting the nipple to put the breast back up on the chest where it belongs.

A breast implant can be placed at the time of breast lift, but this is only when you are looking to increase your breast volume.

Good luck with your surgery.

Damian Marucci, MBBS, FRACS
Australia Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

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Separate lift and aug?

+1

Thanks for your question. You would be a great candidate for a lift. It can be done together but there is less guesswork on brest descent if the procedures are separate. Your surgeon is being cautious which is not a bad thing! That said If you like your general size then a lift would be the procedure of choice and you would loose very little volume. The best way to evaluate ptosis (sag) is by physical exam but a picture can give a preliminary idea. The best picture is a side profile. In general breast lifts are done to not only raise the nipple but also to make the areolar/nipple complex smaller and raise the breast tissue to a more natural youthful position. Of course, the key to a great breast lift is patient selection and technique selection. Areolar lifts are generally good for women with good skin quality, breast tissue reasonably placed and a nipple/areola that are sagging no more than 2 cm. Once the breasts sag past that point, it is necessary to perform a lollipop lift which not only repositions the sagging breast tissues but also the nipple and areola. The final and most aggressive lift is an anchor lift which places both a vertical and horizontal incision. Again the determinant is the degree of sagging, skin quality and amount of breast tissue. Last, if there is a deficiency in breast tissue, an augmentation can be done either together with the lift or as separate procedures. Make sure you visit with a board certified plastic surgeon get get specifics on your situation.

Raj S. Ambay, MD
Tampa Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Lift plus aug

+1

You have fairly good size breats so see how you do with a lift.If you smoke I for sure would do a lift and then an aug later.

Robert Brueck, MD
Fort Myers Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Implants with lift?

+1

The answer varies with what you desire.  If you're find with your DD cup, you can go with a lift alone.  I hope your surgeon is employing a technique that involves using your own tissue to help augment the upper poles.  If you want the full upper poles that come with implants, you could consider a Rubin mastopexy (much more extensive and takes more time) if you wish to avoid implants or if you wish to have the 'implant' look and improve longevity with your procedure, you could consider a reduction with implants so the drooping, heavy tissue is simply removed but this will leave your native breasts smaller in size.  Talk to your surgeon about these options for their input and opinions.

Curtis Wong, MD
Redding Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Breast Lift or Breast Lift with Implants

+1

    If you are happy with the size of your breasts, then you can just get a breast lift.  If you would like your breasts a little larger, an implant can be placed.  They can be performed at the same time.  Find the plastic surgeon with ELITE credentials who performs hundreds of breast lifts each year.  Kenneth Hughes, MD Los Angeles, CA

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 192 reviews

Breast lift with or without implants

+1

Hi! Thank you for your question,


I am Dr. Speron, a proud member of both the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) and the American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons (ASAPS).  I am also certified with the American Board of Plastic Surgery.


When deciding to get a breast lift with or without breast implants, you first need to consult with your doctor on what your goal is.


The breast lift, also known as mastopexy, raises drooping or sagging breasts, relocating the position of the nipples and areola and reshaping contours for a more youthful appearance. The breast lift does not necessarily change breast size. An augmentation is often combined with a lift to enhance volume or fill the upper pole of the breast in a more permanent fashion.


A breast lift raises and firms the breasts by removing excess skin and tightening the surrounding tissue to reshape and support the new breast contour. If you are satisfied with your breast size, a breast lift should suffice. Otherwise you can get a breast lift with implants to increase fullness and improve symmetry of the breasts.


I have provided a direct link below for additional information and before and after pictures.


If you have any further questions, please feel free to call us at 847.696.9900 for a private consultation.


Best of luck and have a great day!
Regards,
Dr. Speron

Sam Speron, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon

Should I Get Implants with my Breast Lift?

+1

This is a very controversial issue. I believe as does your chosen surgeon a 2 staged operation gives the better possibility of a symmetrical outcome. 

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 61 reviews

Timing of implants with lift

+1

Your degree of ptosis (sagging) is significant in terms of the distance that the nipple needs to be lifted.  Although many surgeons would rightly feel comfortable doing both procedures at one time, in your case, I would insist on doing a two stage procedure for safety and predictability reasons.

Scott E. Kasden, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 45 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.