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Can Anything Be Done for Puffy Nipples?

I am 19 and have, in my opinion, underdeveloped nipples. One is relatively larger than the other and they are both puffy with no actual distinction between the areola and nipple itself. Is there any hope for me?

Doctor Answers (9)

Most certainly there is hope

+2

You may have a condition which is common and is referred to as tuberous or constricted breast. You can do a google search for pictures of patients with this to see if it looks familiar. There are options for treatment if the are needed. The shape of women's nipples, areola and breasts varies widely. I assure you that you are not alone in the shape of your breasts. You can always make a consultation with a local board-certified plastic surgeon too for evaluation. You don't have to have surgery but at least you can be better educated about your options. Take care.

Dr Edwards


Las Vegas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Nipple areola surgery

+1

Yes I am sure that your situation can be improved. However, without seeing pictures or examining you in person it is not possible to give you good advice. It may be that you are describing the condition limited to the nipple areolar complex or you may be describing a condition called constricted/tuberous breasts.

Seek consultation with a board-certified plastic surgeon well-trained/experienced in this area. You may be able to improve your understanding of your condition by viewing the link below.

Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 681 reviews

Areola reduction

+1

Areola reduction can be performed under local anesthetic and is relatively straight forward. The aim is to remove the outer dough-nut shape area of tissue and bring the surrounding skin inwards.

The ideal diameter of a areola is at as been shown by research is approximately 4.5 centimeters and our aim is to get it to this as near as possible to this.

Adrian Richards, MD
London Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

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Reducing puffy areolas and nipples

+1

Puffy nipples will ultimately subside with time.  However, there are surgeries that can reduce the puffiness of the areola.   Asymmetric nipples and areolas can also be matched with surgery

Raffy Karamanoukian, MD, FACS
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 46 reviews

Puffy nipple treatment

+1

Don't be discouraged. Please seek out a personal consultation with a surgeon who is certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery.  You may just have some variation of inverted nipples. These can typically be corrected with an office procedure done under local anesthesia!

Carmen Kavali, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Beware of operating on the nipple and areola without all the facts

+1

Many women have nipples that are a little different from what they may consider "normal".

Nipples may be:

  • Inverted (indented - either occasionally or permanently)
  • Hypertrophic (overdeveloped)
  • Asymmetric (one very different from the other)

Remember what the function of the breast is:  for breastfeeding, and for pleasure!

Any surgery on the nipple could possibly interfere with these functions of your breasts.

I counsel young women to beware of having any major surgery on their nipples that might disrupt the blood supply, nerve supply (sensation) or ductal supply (milk traveling) to the nipples. 

The situation you have described may in fact be related to another condition: tubular breasts.  This variant of normal causes an enlarged, puffy areola and somewhat tubular, or banana-shaped breast.  The breast tissue can "herniate" into the areola, causing an abnormal shape and lack of definition to this region. 

Be sure to visit a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon who specializes in complex and reconstructive surgery of the breast for a complete history and physical examination.  I'm sure we can give you some answers! 

Karen M. Horton, M.D., M.Sc., F.R.C.S.C.

Karen M. Horton, MD
San Francisco Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

There is hope

+1

Nipple asymmetry is very common in all women. In fact, I have yet to meet a patient with perfectly symmetrical breasts. Correcting these asymmetries is possible. However, ultimately it depends on what the actual problem is. If you would like the areola diameters to be more even, then a small areola reduction is possible on one side. If it is the lack of projection that concerns you, then you may want to consider having some type of implant placed behind the nipple to give it more projection. This is a common problem that I see in my breast reconstruction patients.

Kevin Brenner, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Treatment for puffy nipples

+1

 

There are many treatments that may help your condition. The most important thing is to determine whether the underlying cause. It is best to get a consultation with a board-certified plastic surgeon who may evaluate you and determine why your nipples appear the way they do. If you have a condition like tuberous breast syndrome, you may benefit from a small breast lift or a small areola or surgery. If the shape and contour of your breasts is normal but you are unhappy with the contour of the nipple, a small surgery performed under local anesthesia may do the trick.

Pat Pazmino, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 58 reviews

Treatment of Puffy Nipples

+1

Without seeing you no one can give you a good answer BUT plastic surgeons are "problem solvers". You should see a good plastic surgeon who should be able to offer you some idea of what is going on , why and what can be done for it. You may have to see more than one plastics surgeon because theri experience and their creative thought vary.

John P. Stratis, MD
Harrisburg Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.