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Best Implants for Exercising?

There are so many different complications recently,now i am going to have my surgery and im gettin nervous.Im torn between getting my silicon implants above or below the muscle.I work out two to three times a week with push ups, pull ups, sit ups.I know it takes time to heal but when im healed can i resume lifting my whole body weight??138lbs? Would it be better to get my implants above the muscle?Iv nursed 3children and went from a C to a B, i want to be a large D. I sag a lil, no lift recomended.

Doctor Answers (11)

Depends on your body

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Being so fit, you probably have greater muscle mass than non-athletic patients. As a result, breast implants are almost always placed underneath the pectoral muscles (sub-pectoral placement) to ensure a natural-looking outcome. For highly muscular competitive body builders that have to flex their muscles on stage during a competition, placing the implants above the muscle may also be considered.

Increased muscle mass also means that your plastic surgeon must select implants that are sized in proportion to your body. Rather than simply selecting larger implants, I recommend implants with specific profiles. Years of strength training and fat loss mean that models have typically lost upper pole breast mass, volume from the breast's superior and superior-medial poles (this can visualized as 8 and 12 on an analogue clock) and general breast fullness.

The implants must also be chosen in proportion to the dimensions of a woman's chest wall. One of the most important goals of the procedure is to create great cleavage by using wide diameter implants without leading to a unified-looking breast (symmastia). I carefully measure the patient's chest wall before selecting implants based on these figures to maximize cleavage and leave behind a pleasing, natural-looking result. This approach works well for all patients, regardless of whether they wish to enhance their bust size by a small or large amount.

I have performed breast augmentation on many, many fitness models and athletes, and my patients have gone on to maintain or improve their muscular definition and continued to exercising without experiencing any negative effects resulting from breast augmentation.


Toronto Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 57 reviews

Breast implant placement in the subfascial plane for weight lifters

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Thank you for this very important question. For athletic women especially weightlifters, I prefer placing the implant in the subfascial plane which will minimize movement of the implants during weightlifting and realizes some of the benefits of breast implant placement under the muscle.

Kevin Tehrani, MD, FACS
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 40 reviews

Natural looling breast implant

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Getting the implants above the muscle depends on several factors.

I offer patient's a simple analogy to illustrate what we mean:

Q: If you take a baseball and you cover it with a silksheet, what will it look like?

A: Like a baseball, you will even see the stitching.

Q: Now if you take that same baseball and cover it with a comforter what will you see?

A: It depends on how thick the comforter is but generally you will see a softly shaped lump.

So now the question is what do you have on your chest, silk sheets or comforters?

The way we determine this is by looking at your chest, if I can see your ribs (under the muscle) then you anatomy will have a hard time disguising the implant whether it is placed under or over the muscle and you are more likely better off with a silicone implant. Another way of measuring this is to pinch your upper chest skin (similar to pinch and inch of your waist on the Special K commercial). If you have less than an 2 cm (under 4/5 of an inch) than you have "silk sheets"

If you have a thicker skin/fat/breast layer that pinches over an inch than you have the option of going under or over.

Now the exception to the rule:

Q: What happens if you change the baseball to a volleyball?

A: All bets are off, whether you put it under or over the muscle it will not look natural.

The last issue is the implant shape. There are some anatomic shaped implants but I have generally found them to produce no significant difference in outcome with the exception of breast cancer reconstruction. However, this is my personal opinion.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

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Breast Implant Placement

+1

Hi there-

I have several professional athletes as patients, and their implants are under the pec muscle. Unless you are a competitive body builder, the advantages of this placement far outweigh the short lived increase in discomfort after surgery, and movement of the implants with muscular contraction is not a generally a problem as long as you don't workout nude.

Armando Soto, MD, FACS
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Breast augmentation and exercising.

+1

In cases where a person lifts weights often and heavy weights I recommend placing the breast implant above the pectoralis muscle.This gives a more natural look . When the chest muscle flexes this can distort the implant and give the breast a funny shape. I would also use silicon gel implant  instead of saline if your breast tissue is thin for a better look.

Sheila Bond, MD
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Best Implants for Exercising

+1

You are asking so many differing question that without a posted photo I find giving accurate response very hard. My guess is a above muscle implant at least a 450 cc HP. More likely you will need close to 600 cc's - BUT no photo!. You than can exercise without muscular implant lateral distortion. 

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
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Breast Implants in Athletic Person

+1

There are good reasons for placing Breast Implants in both positions. However, for someone like you, who works out and uses her arms vigorously, the only choice should be to place them above the muscle. This is a lesson learned from many failures. Your normal activities and arm use trump all other considerations. 

Robert T. Buchanan, MD
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Breast implants

+1

I usually place them partially under the muscle.  This should not impact your working out in any significant way once you heal. 

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
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ABOVE

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I hate to sound like a broken record but, your normal breast tissue is above the muscle. After children, your breast tissue goes away, thus you need it replaced - ABOVE the muscle. No one puts it totally under the muscle, it is only at most half to a third  under and when you contract your pecks, it deforms the implant.

William B. Rosenblatt, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Best implant placement for athletic women: subfascial or split-muscle

+1

Your question is a very important one because of the different trade-offs. Under-muscle implants may produce a more natural look, particularly in women with low body fat. But they will be very prone to what are called "animation deformities" which are distortions of the breast shape with muscle flexion. This is related in my opinion to the method used for placement, which typically involves cutting the muscle attachment to the ribs in order to let the implant sit in the proper position.

The usual solution for this, going over the muscle, results in an unnatural look especially on the athletic figure. In some cases a modified version of over called subfascial can be helpful, but this adds support more than coverage. The split muscle technique, which gives coverage to the upper portion of the breast but avoids cutting the muscle attachment, is often the best of both. It minimizes animation deformities while adding coverage where it is most needed.

Richard Baxter, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
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These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.