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Can a Naturally Upturned Nose with Exposed Vertical Nostrils & Slightly Bulbous Tip Be Fixed w/o Changing Face Too Much?

I've consulted with a few BH surgeons who told me I had a beautiful and perfect bridge. But in profile my nose is very pointed and you can see far up into my nostrils, esp left side. Tip is bulbous and I use shadow along the sides to lessen the appearance of width. Since I am pleased with my looks and friends tell me they like my nose can it be corrected without changing my appearance as I am very animated? Can vertically exposed nostrils be fixed? The tip refined without making it more pointy?

Doctor Answers (6)

Rhinoplasty

+1

Your posted photos are inadequate for a full assessment. Your claim of a bulbous tip, vertical nostrils and a visible left nostril on side view are corroborated by the photos though.

The nostril orientation and tip shape can be altered using tip shaping sutures placed in the tip cartilages. Lowering the outer nostril rim and rotating the tip slightly downward is more complex and the modalities employed would depend on the physical findings that cannot be known from only photos.

From the bend in the columella I suspect you would also benefit from a columella strut graft. I do not see how you can fix all that and that not change your face. Your nose is an integral part of your face.

My response to your question/post does not represent formal medical advice or constitute a doctor patient relationship. You need to consult with i.e. personally see a board certified plastic surgeon in order to receive a formal evaluation and develop a doctor patient relationship.


Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon

Rhinoplasty

+1

dropping down a tip that is raised too much is much more difficult than shortening a nose that is too long.  However, I think Youncould get improvement by reducing the projection of the nose, bringing it closer to your face.  That would also change the shape of you nostrils from vertical to more oval shaped and their size could even be reduced with alar wedge resection.

Ronald J. Edelson, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Elongating a nose with rhinoplasty

+1

Dear Bonacker,

-Yes the nose can be elongated using cartilage

-The tip can be refined as well without being pointy

-You should see a few rhinoplasty surgeons so they can show you what is possible

Best regards,

Nima Shemirani

Nima Shemirani, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

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Best Rhinoplasty for Upturned Nose

+1

Hi B,

It appears that you have had a previous rhinoplasty.  You now have excessive columellar show (the center divider of the nose), and alar retraction of the lateral nostril.  Those issues can be corrected as well as refinement of your nasal tip with rhinoplasty.  It is a complex surgical procedure.  Choose your rhinoplasty surgeon most carefully.

Best,

 

Dr, P

Michael A. Persky, MD
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Lengthening the Nose

+1

As with any facial plastic surgery, the goal is to enhance your appearance while still maintaining a natural look.  The length of the nose can be lengthened and the tip softened.  From the base view (looking up into the nose), there is asymmetry of your septum that is visible.  Please consult with a board certified specialist who can best assist you in achieving the results you seek.

 

Kimberly Lee, MD
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Sort Nose with Bulbous Tip

+1

Your nose can be lengthened, the bulbous tip reduced, and the asymmetry corrected by straightening your septum. An ideal natural result is achieved when the nose is changed so it is proportional to the surrounding facial features.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.