Narrow Pinched Nose? (photo)

I had rhinoplasty in 2005, a bump on the nose was removed, but left the nose and tip of the nose a narrow and pointy had before surgery rounder shape of the tip of the nose. Recently, I also got breathing problems and feels like it is coming from the lower part of the nose. What can be done to correct the nose shape and breathing problems?

Doctor Answers (6)

Treating a pinched tip following prior rhinoplasty

+1

The problems you've encountered are fairly common, unfortunately, after reductive rhinoplasty in which the structural support of the nose is weakened. The result is pinching and collapse of the nose along with breathing difficulties.

You want to be careful about relying on filler injections to address your issues as this is unlikely to improve your breathing problems.

You can learn more about pinched tip treatment at my web reference link below.


Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Improving a pinched nasal tip and improving breathing

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A revision rhinoplasty can help redefine your nasal tip, while at the same time improve your breathing problem.

Raffy Karamanoukian, MD, FACS
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 47 reviews

Pinched tip

+1

If the nasal tip appears pinched in, soemtimes manuevers intra-operatively during revision surgery can improve this.  Occasionally I will use fillers for minor irregularites.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

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Non-surgical Rhinoplasty is great for revision cases

+1

Dermafillers are great to use for revision rhinoplasty cases because an expert injector can contour and shape the nose very carefully.  If there has been an over reduction during the initial procedure, fillers can rebuild your shape.

 

Look for someone who has a lot of experience with non-surgical rhinoplasties as this is an advanced technique.

 

David Mabrie, MD
Bay Area Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 56 reviews

Reductive cosmetic rhinoplasty resulting in functional problems

+1

During your previous rhinoplasty a significant amount of cartilage was removed in order to achieve a more narrow and pointy appearance, and over time the healing and scarring forces on this framework have caused it to collapse and give you breathing issues.  The solution is to restore the strength of this framework by adding cartilage back to it.  Structural cartilage grafts (alar batten or lateral crural struts) can help your nose and nasal valves to resist the collapsing forces during dynamic inspiration, and help restore your breathing.  

Donald B. Yoo, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 19 reviews

Reduction rhinoplasty can cause functional problems many years down the road

+1

Your story unfortunately is one that is very common in my practice. Reducing the nose in shape and size, especially reducing a hump and refining a nasal tip, can cause horrible functional problems later in life. Over the last 20 years a true paradigm shift in rhinpoplasty has occurred. Nasal surgeons have shifted away from the old practices of removing cartilage and have developed procedures to preserve the function of the nose while at the same time providing the aesthetic benefits the operation can provide. Revision rhinoplasty aims at restoring the competency and strength to these cartilages and to the internal and external nasal valves which can become damged during traditional excisional procedures. These revisions most often entail getting grafting material from your septum (if any cartilage is left), your ear, or from a rib. My advice would be to find a surgeon who is experienced in revision surgery and is also an expert in nasal function such as a board certified facial plastic surgeon.

Giancarlo Zuliani, MD
Rochester Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.