How Will my Right Breast Capsular Contracture After Reconstruction Be Surgically Corrected? (photo)

I want more aesthetic results with the left too. In my previous questions I am getting responses on how I should be happy with my reconstruction because after all I had a mastectomy. I would like to ask you all for more compassion. I had beautiful breasts before my mastectomy and I would like to at least be able to look at myself in the mirror without crying. Would overfilled saline implants be an option to revise my reconstuction? I do care about firmness. I would like to be close to 1000cc.

Doctor Answers (3)

Fuller breasts

+1

I would not go with saline.Silicone is much better.Whether your pockets can accomodate 1000 is unknown.I always tell patients the bigger the implant the harder the breast will be.


Fort Myers Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

How will my right breast be corrected? (photo)

+1

In general, because silicone gel is more viscous, the texture of gel implants is more natural than saline.   This especially holds true for larger implants (such as you are contemplating), and for post-mastectmy patients because there is little or no native breast tissue to camouflage the implant.

If you have capsular contracture on your right side, the capsule can be removed and the implant replaced.  Acellular dermal matrix may be of some help in improving the quality of your reconstruction.

Steve Laverson, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

Breast Reconstruction

+1

When you see yourself in the mirror tell the person in the mirror  You are a Beautiful woman and those are beautiful Breasts.

Now you should be able to discuss you desires and the way you want to look with your plastic surgeon. He/ She will be able to tell you what is possible and how to achieve it.

It is difficult to give you a advise with one photo. You need an in person evaluation.

Samir Shureih, MD
Baltimore Plastic Surgeon

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.