Will my polly beak deformity go away after a year or so? (photos)

I've also noticed my hump has grown back, will that go away as well?

I'm into my 4 months of post op. I used to have a hump, but that was shaved down and added a little thin silicone thing. After about a month, my nose was straight &no bump. But after 4 months, it seems like my tip is starting to droop causing a pollybeak. It's noticeable from side&front. When I smile from front, nose forms a V shape which I didn't have before. When there's also bright flash photography, you can sort of notice where my bone was shaved down.

Doctor Answers (9)

Progressive return of bridge bump and pollybeak deformity

+1
It's unlikely that your supra tip fullness and pollybeak will smooth out on their own based on your description and photos. 

Its hard to be specific without an examination, but you could certainly consider a revision procedure once your nose has healed further. 

You should discuss your concerns with your surgeon as that is who has the best idea of what was done during your original surgery. 

In the meantime, you can can read more about pollybeak deformity repair at my web reference link below. 


Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Will my polly beak deformity go away after a year or so?

+1

Only re operation on the "polly beak" deformity is the option. Sorry for your poor result in the initial surgery./// 

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 62 reviews

Nasal hump and polybeak deformity after rhinoplasty.

+1
Nasal hump and polybeak deformity after rhinoplasty. Yes you appear to have a residual hump and poly beak deformity which will require a revision rhinoplasty. Wait three months more before having the surgery and then return to your surgeon or get a second opinion from a revision rhinoplasty surgeon who is very experienced.

Toby Mayer, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Supratip overprojection

+1
I think that it's a combination of overprojection (possibly the implant) of the area above the tip, while simultaneously not having quite enough projection added to the tip region.  Speak to your surgeon about revision (it's too soon now) when you are completely healed (wait at least until 9-12 months after surgery).  These are correctable issues.

John Frodel, MD
Atlanta Facial Plastic Surgeon

Pollybeak

+1
It is unlikely that your pollybeak deformity will improve with time.  I believe the combination of weak tip support and dorsal augmentation with an implant has caused the pollybeak tip deformity.  I recommend that you speak with your surgeon about your concerns.  I prefer to wait a year before performing any revisions though so you may have to be patient and wait for the nose to completely heal.

Eugene Kim, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Implant Migration

+1

Hi,

If you had a reduction of your hump and then silicone implant, then the implant has migrated forward and is causing your pollybeak. This will not go away on its own and will require a revision.

Best,

Dr.S.

Oleh Slupchynskyj, MD, FACS
New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 212 reviews

Pollybeak

+1
Thank you for the photos and the changes that you are experiencing probably will not resolve on their own and I would advice you to discuss your concerns with your surgeon. Dr. Corbin

Frederic H. Corbin, MD
Brea Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

Loss of Tip Projection

+1
I don't believe your loss of tip projection, pollybeak, will resolve on its own accord. Consult with your surgeon and if necessary seek a second opinion.

Best wishes 

George C. Peck, Jr, MD
West Orange Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

4 Months Post Op Rhinoplasty

+1
Discuss your pre op and post op photos with your Plastic Surgeon.  It can take months to see the final result.   If a revision is needed, your surgeon may want to address that.  

Robert E. Zaworski, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 25 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.