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My skin is still loose under one side of my jaw. What are my options for a revision Facelift?

Surgery was dec16, 2014 face and neck lift. My neck on one side is loose just under my jaw it's very noticeable. Dr mentioned a revision by cutting around the ear again. I'm still sore to touch especially on that side. I had thread lift 8 yrs ago. My dr tried to get them all out but he said he couldn't ,maybe the ones that were buried to deep are causing swelling and pain?

Doctor Answers 7

One-sided loose skin after a Toronto facelift procedure

Thank you for your question.

A #facelift procedure is an invasive surgery but a very gratifying one.

It is also true that previous threads make a #facelift and #necklift procedure more complicated.

You are still very early post-surgery.  Healing does not always happen at the same time between the right and left; swelling, bruising, position at night, etc.

Most of us plastic surgeons in #Toronto will recommend to wait 3-6 months after a procedure before going back into the same surgical field.  Going back to early will be met with more scarring and bleeding.

Once you've been patient and waited a bit longer, yes, the incision could be reopened and subsequent tightening could be performed.

Healing and surgery are not exact science and occasionally, small revisions are required.

I hope this helps!

Best,
Dr. Marc DuPere, #Toronto plastic surgeon, Toronto and Richmond Hill offices, 416-929-9800


Toronto Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

Have a question? Ask a doctor

Revision facelift

The presence of threads makes a facelift more difficult. It is only 2 months after the operation - i would wait at least until 6 months to let everything heal from the last operation. If areas are painful then I would massage them at least twice a day, which will help the sensitivity resolve. If the laxity is still present and bothering you after 6 months then the options are a skin tightening laser such as Thermage, or revisional surgery. Regards Dr Charles Cope

Charles Cope, MD
Sydney Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Take a step back

As you are not even yet 2 months after your surgery, I would recommend that you try your best to be patient and let things heal.  This is certainly a situation made more difficult by the presence of the "threads" which are indeed difficult to get out.  I always recommend waiting a minimum of 6 month, hopefully longer, before revision surgery is performed. 

John Frodel, MD
Atlanta Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Revisional surgery after a facelift probably should be postponed for six months.

It is regrettable that a revisional operation may be indicated. However before embarking on it the healing process should be nearly complete. A minimum of six months should pass before the operation is undertaken.

Vincent N. Zubowicz, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Allow natural skin elasticity to return post face and neck lift

There is a substantial amount of swelling in the chin and neck regions are facelift surgery - especially revisionary surgery like you had. Allow your skin to recover some of its natural elasticity and shape before considering a revision - you'll be surprised how things will look in a few months. 

Face lift looseness

Everyone is anxious as they heal from a face lift.
Be patient.
At six months, you and your surgeon can discuss a revision.
Until then, let your healing proceed. 
As long as you see slow improvement, no matter how slow, all is usually well.
If your healing stalls, a revision can be done in the summer.

Early Healing after Facelift

Thank you for the question. It is really quite early after your facelift -- particularly as this was a revision of a thread lift. If the asymmetry persists at 6 months, revision surgery could be discussed. Typically, revision is not performed for a year unless there is a more urgent consideration.

Evan Ransom, MD
Bay Area Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 56 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.