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Can my surgeon fix my bone and cartilage in one surgery?

My nose is broken I am having surgery next week. Dr. said he has to fix bone first and then when it heals do cartilage. I wanted to know if it can be done all in one surgery

Doctor Answers (8)

Nose

+1
Yes they can. See several facial plastic specialists and make sure you like their photos. See my web site for a good example. Good luck!!


Charlotte Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

Nasal Injury

+1
It sounds like perhaps you broke the bones in your nose and also your nasal septum.  Is that the case?  If that is so and you are still growing, it is appropriate to delay the septal repair. If you nose is really smashed up it may also be appropriate to wait.  i really cannot comment on this any further without examining you.

Stuart H. Bentkover, MD
Boston Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Rhinoplasty to fix bone and cartilage

+1
Rhinoplasty involves shaping both bone and cartilage routinely and there is no need for 2 separate procedures. The nasal bones can be reset with osteotomies, while cartilage removal or grafting techniques can all be performed at the same time under one general anesthetic. For many examples please see  the link below

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 60 reviews

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Nasal fracture

+1
If the septum is bent from the fracture it can often be splinted or straightened at the same time as the nasal bone treatment. However, revision is often necessary in 6 months or so to shave down any bumps or irregularities.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Rhinoplasty following nasal trauma.

+1
Your surgeon may have a reasonable plan.  If the facial fractures are extensive with severe disruption of the bony nasal framework and the adjacent facial bones, I would recommend open repair of the fractures accompanied by closed manipulation of the cartilaginous nasal structure followed by delayed definitive rhinoplasty.  If the nasal bone fracture is of mild to moderate severity then it would be reasonable to proceed with definitive nasal repair.  Contrary to recommendations from other surgeons, I would not simply consult with a "Board Certified Plastic Surgeon" as this individual may spend the majority of his/her time playing around in the breasts or abdomen.  Instead seek out experienced, qualified rhinoplasty surgeons.  

Mario J. Imola, MD, DDS, FRCSC, FACS. 

Mario J. Imola, MD, DDS
Denver Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 50 reviews

Nasal Bones and Nasal Tip Surgery

+1
As long as the swelling is reasonably resolved, you should be able to have a standard rhinoplasty which includes surgery on the nasal bones and the lower lateral cartilages of your nasal tip. Consult a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon.

George C. Peck, Jr, MD
West Orange Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Can my surgeon fix my bone and cartilage in one surgery?

+1
An experienced Plastic Surgeon can correct both of your problems at the same setting.  Consult with a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon for an exam, and to discuss your concerns and expectations.

Robert E. Zaworski, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

Septorhinoplasty can be done in one surgery

+1
A broken nose and deviated septum can be fixed with a simultaneous rhinoplasty and septoplasty, or septorhinoplasty. If your nose was recently broken the bone can simply be reset with by elevating any displaced nasal bones. The damaged septum can also be straightened during the same surgery. There will be more swelling to contend with during the septum surgery, but it is possible to perform the septoplasty. Thanks for your question. Best wishes.
For additional information about nose surgery:

Gregory Park, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 65 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.