Does my Mother Need Blepharoplasty and if So Does It Need to Be Bilateral? for a Slowly Progressing Ptosis over 1.5 Years?

symptoms only in one eye, apparently droop to half cover the pupil,visual fields done with eyelids taped up okay but untaped showed a deficit in the affected eye. currently affecting routine reading and computer work sometimes. is diabetic but retinal exam is normal. Ophthalmologist states need to do both eyes because fixing only the affected side will cause the good eyelid to become affected as a surgical side effect. Can the surgery be repeated if it is ineffective on the first procedure?

Doctor Answers (2)

Blepharoplasty and ptosis repair

+1

 Blepharoplasty is performed for cosmetic and functional purposes on the upper eyelids. It involves removal of excess skin, fat, and occasionally  a strip of orbicularis oculi muscle when needed. Ptosis repair  involves tightening up Mueller's muscle or the levator muscle. These are 2 separate procedures that can be performed together or separately  depending upon the anatomy and presenting problems.


Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 55 reviews

Eyelid lift on one side or both sides

+1

You can certainly do a ptosir repair and blepharoplasty only on one side if only one eye is affected visually.  We often recommend doing both sides for a few reasons.  First, it is much harder to get good symmetry when you only operate on one side.  It is difficult to match the operative side to the non-operative side during surgery due to swelling and changes from the local injection.  You can also get a lowering of the "normal" eyelid when the affected lid is raised (Hering's law). Second, the operated side will cosmetically look different due to scarring and having some skin removed.  Unless there is a contraindication, I recommend patients have both sides done simultaneously for best results.  

Matheson A. Harris, MD
Salt Lake City Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

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