Why is my Hair Still Falling out at a Great Rate at 63 Years Old? Do I Need HRT?

Doctor Answers (3)

Rapid hair loss

+1
In general, individuals with rapid hair loss are usually not good hair transplant candidates

That said, rapid hair loss at age 63 is never due to genetic hair loss but rather "something else"  (of which there are dozens of reasons).  Usually this other reason for hair loss is not treatable with a hair transplant. 

Individuals with rapid hair loss may wish to see a dermatologist to evaluate potential causes 


Toronto Dermatologist

Continuing Hair Loss

+1

Hair loss happens differently for everyone. Though it seems the progression of hair loss should slow down as you get older, this is not the case for some people. Some begin losing hair as early as their teen years, and some later in life. In general, your ancestry is a good sign of how hair loss will happen for you. I advise you to see a doctor about your hair loss, as it can be a sign of underlying illness. Your doctor can also address your question about HRT.

Sanusi Umar, MD
Redondo Beach Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Hair Loss at 63

+1

Nobody really ever NEEDS hair replacement therapy (HRT), as it's really something you may choose to do if you want to improve your appearance.  At 63, if your hair is falling out at a "great rate" as you say, at some point I imagine you may progress to having no hair at all, except for a horseshoe pattern above your ears and in the back.  Then, the question becomes:  Do I get hair replacement now, or do I wait until I have more hair loss.  This is a very common scenario and something you may wish to speak with a hair transplant specialist.

John E. Frank, MD
New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

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These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.