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Is It Possible to Get my Dorsal Hump Removed (Rhinoplasty) During my Septoplasty?

I'm a guy and I've been uncomfortable with it for so long and hate this hump on my nose. How can I convince my doctor to get this done for free. I'm 17, no job and my parents can't afford it. My Septoplasty will happen when I'm 18, so since they're working in the same area, can't they just file it down? I just want the bump removed.

Doctor Answers (6)

It's common to have a "hump" removed at the same time as a septoplasty, however this won't be covered by insurance

+1

Removing a hump is commonl performed at the same time as a septoplasty. However, this is additional surgery. Insurance companies only reimburse or cover surgery to fix a problem, such as a deviated septum. If you decide to go beyond a septoplasty, please make sure you see an expert in both septoplasty and rhinoplasty. This should not be about saving money. You have one nose and should have if fixed just once. If you can't afford cosmetic surgery, hold off until you can.


New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 34 reviews

Can I have a dorsal hump removed during septoplasty surgery?

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Occasionally, if a structural abnormality contributes to impaired breathing, insurance may cover the part of surgery which fixes this issue.  This usually the case when a patient has nostrils that are pinched, or a crooked nose. A hump does not impair breathing, so it is not likely that rasping of a nasal hump will be covered by insurance. This will take extra time in the operating room and an additional surgeon's fee is applied. Thanks, and I hope this helps answer your question.

Paul S. Nassif, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 29 reviews

Is It Possible to Get my Dorsal Hump Removed (Rhinoplasty) During my Septoplasty?

+1

Insurance won't cover any cosmetic changes to your nose. If you're undergoing a septoplasty and turbinate reduction, your plastic surgeon can perform a cosmetic rhinoplasty at the same time. The costs vary widely by surgeon, region and extent of the cosmetic changes you desire. This might range from $3000-7500. There is unfortunately no way to "game the system" and have your insurance cover the cosmetic portion of the procedure. Trying to do so can backfire and result in a denial of coverage for the entire procedure which would leave you on the hook for a very large medical bill. It's just not worth the risk.

Stephen Weber MD, FACS

Stephen Weber, MD, FACS
Denver Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 34 reviews

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Is It Possible to Get my Dorsal Hump Removed (Rhinoplasty) During my Septoplasty?

+1

 Yes, a Rhinoplasty can be performed along with a Septoplasty and is in fact called a Septorhinoplasty however, you should discuss this with your surgeon to be sure that he/she is an experienced Rhinoplasty Surgeon as well as one experienced in Septoplasty.  Hope this helps.

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Septoplasty versus Septorhinoplasty and coverage

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I would suggest a good examination by an experienced surgeon to have a proper diagnosis. If your surgeon states that what you need done is cosmetic in nature and not functional then the insurance would not cover. If it is functional then your surgeons office will contact your insurance company and verify benefits as well as Get an estimate on what the insurance company will pay. Your surgeon always has a choice of providing free work as long as they do not bill the insurance company for it. Best regards!

Michael Elam, MD
Orange County Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 123 reviews

Removal dorsal hump

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Removing the dorsal hump may result in a wide dorsum, open roof, this will require osteotomy. This is cosmetic and is not covered by insurance. What you are asking for is a full rhinoplasty. This needs more operative time, anesthesia and expertise.

Samir Shureih, MD
Baltimore Plastic Surgeon

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.