Why Are my Breasts Uneven After BA and Lift?

I had my surgery (breast augmentation and lift) a couple weeks into March and they were fine at first but the more i look at them the right seems to be sitting lower! What's going on?

Doctor Answers (5)

Early in the Postoperative Phase

+1

You are early in your healing process and it is common that one breast will be ahead of the other in terms of settling and swelling.  At this point, it is important to relax, trust your surgeon, and follow his/her postoperative instructions.


West Palm Beach Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Breast position and lift

+1

Remember that breasts in general are a bit asymmetric.  Yours are probably no exception. If you are also early post-op you need to give it time for things to relax a bit.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

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Breast position after breast augmentation and lift

+1

It is still early after your surgery but the asymmetry you described may be due to lowering the breast fold to much or not releasing the other breast fold enough.

pictures would help

 

See your surgeon to see if a revision maybe needed at about 6 months after original surgery.

 

Good luck

Tal T. Roudner, MD, FACS
Coral Gables Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 77 reviews

Breast Asymmetry after Breast Augmentation/Lifting?

+1

Thank you for the question

Keep in mind that you are only about 6 weeks out of your breast augmentation/lifting operation. Breast implants may “settle” at different rates and swelling may dissipate at different rates as well. In other words, your breasts may change significantly (size and symmetry) over the course of the next few months.

I would suggest continued patience and follow up with your plastic surgeon;  evaluate the end results of surgery closer to one year postop.

Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 680 reviews

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